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Boat(w)right Family Genealogy in America

Generation 8


8-125. WILLIAM THOMAS BOATWRIGHT (ANANIAS8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1819 in Tennessee, and died Aft. 1880 in Dyer County, Tennessee. He married ISABELLA J. WORTHINGTON. She was born 1821 in North Carolina, and died Aft. 1880 in Dyer County, Tennessee.


Notes for WILLIAM THOMAS BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: William Boatwright
Date: October 31, 1850
Age: 30
Estimated birth year: abt 1820
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 9, Obion, Tennessee
Occupation: Farmer
Page: 374
Roll: M432_891

1860 Census:
Name: W T Boatwright
Date: September 5, 1860
Age in 1860: 41
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: District 9, Dyer, Tennessee
Occupation: Farmer
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dyersburg
Roll: M653_1248
Page: 373
Year: 1860
Head of Household: W T Boatwright

1880 Census:
Name: William T. BOATRIGHT
Date: June 29, 1880
Age: 51
Estimated birth year: <1829>
Birthplace: Tennessee
Occupation: Farming
Relationship to head-of-household: Self
Home in 1880: District 5, Dyer, Tennessee
Marital status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Male
Spouse's name: Isabella BOATRIGHT
Father's birthplace: TN
Mother's birthplace: TN
Census Place: District 5, Dyer, Tennessee; 
Roll: T9_1253; Family History Film: 1255253; Page: 133B; 
Enumeration District: 15; Image: .

Notes for ISABELLA J. WORTHINGTON:
1850 Census:
Name: Isabella Boatwright
Date: October 31, 1850
Age: 27
Estimated birth year: abt 1823
Birth place: North Carolina
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 9, Obion, Tennessee
Page: 374
Roll: M432_891

1860 Census:
Name: I Boatwright
Date: September 5, 1860
Age in 1860: 38
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1860: District 9, Dyer, Tennessee
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dyersburg
Roll: M653_1248
Page: 373
Year: 1860
Head of Household: W T Boatwright

1880 Census:
Name: Isabella BOATRIGHT
Date: June 29, 1880
Age: 59
Estimated birth year: <1821>
Birthplace: North Carolina
Occupation: Keeping House
Relationship to head-of-household: Wife
Home in 1880: District 5, Dyer, Tennessee
Marital status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Female
Spouse's name: William T. BOATRIGHT
Father's birthplace: NC
Mother's birthplace: NC
Census Place: District 5, Dyer, Tennessee; 
Roll: T9_1253; Family History Film: 1255253; Page: 133B; 
Enumeration District: 15; Image: .


Children of WILLIAM BOATWRIGHT and ISABELLA WORTHINGTON are:

9-269.    i. MARTHA BOATWRIGHT, b. 1844, Tennessee.

9-270.   ii. JOHN W. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1846, Tennessee.

9-271.  iii. REBECCA ANN BOATWRIGHT, b. 1848, Tennessee.

9-272.   iv. JAMES T. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1851, Tennessee; d. Abt. 1879, Dyer County,
                                   Tennessee.
9-273.    v. MARY FRANCES BOATWRIGHT, b. 1851, Tennessee; d. 08 Mar 1922, Dyer 
                                       County, Tennessee.
9-274.   vi. WILLIAM A. BOATWRIGHT, b. 24 Oct 1857, Dyer County, Tennessee; 
                                     d. 30 Jul 1945, Dyersburg, Dyer County, 
                                     Tennessee.
9-275.  vii. ARTEMSIS E. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1859, Dyer County, Tennessee. 

9-276. viii. ANANIAS NORRIS BOATRIGHT, b. 1862, Dyer County, Tennessee;
                                         d. 18 Apr 1935, Hunt County, Texas.
9-277.   ix. CHARLES M. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1868, Dyer County, Tennessee.

8-126. MARY BOATWRIGHT (THOMAS8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1826 in Henderson County, Tennessee. She married JAMES WISE. He was born 1828 in Tennessee, and died Bef. 1860 in Tennessee.


Notes for MARY BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Mary Wise 
Date: November 29, 1850
Age: 22 
Estimated birth year: abt 1828 
Birth Place: Tennessee 
Gender: Female 
Home in 1850 (City,County,State): District 16, Henderson, Tennessee 
Census Place: District 16, Henderson, Tennessee; 
Roll: M432_883; Page: 224B; Image: 452.
living next door to Mary parents

1860 Census:
Name: M. Wise Boatwright
Date: September 18, 1860
Age in 1860: 34
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Lexington
Roll: M653_1256
Page: 327
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Tm Boatwright

Notes for JAMES WISE:
1850 Census:
Name: Mary Wise 
Date: November 29, 1850
Age: 22 
Estimated birth year: abt 1828 
Birth Place: Tennessee 
Gender: Female 
Home in 1850 (City,County,State): District 16, Henderson, Tennessee 
Census Place: District 16, Henderson, Tennessee; 
Roll: M432_883; Page: 224B; Image: 452.
living next door to Mary parents

8-127. JAMES BOATWRIGHT (THOMAS8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1831 in Henderson County, Tennessee.


Notes for JAMES BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: James Boatright
Date: November 29, 1850
Age: 19
Estimated birth year: abt 1831
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 16, Henderson County, Tennessee
Page: 224
Roll: M432_883

8-128. SAMUEL A. BOATWRIGHT (THOMAS8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1833 in Henderson County, Tennessee, and died 23 Oct 1864 in Florence, Florence County, South Carolina. He married NANCY CAROLINE DEROSSETT. She was born 1835 in Tennessee, and died 04 Sep 1871 in Henderson County, Tennessee.


Notes for SAMUEL A. BOATWRIGHT:

Samuel is not listed in the Florence National Cemetery but the high number buried there are unknown. Samuel was captured on March 24, 1864 at Union City, Tennessee. Samuel was held at Andersonville Prison in Georgia from April 21, 1864 until early September, 1864. Samuel was then transferred to Florence, South Carolina prisoner camp, where he died on October 23, 1864. See notes on Andersonville Prison Camp under Ananias Boatwright (Samuel's brother).

Florence Stockcade Sketch The Florence Prison Stockade was in operation for approximately 5 months during the time period of Sept 1864 through Feb 1865. During this time, as many as 15 - 18,000 Union soldiers were held captive. Of these, approximately 2,802 Union soldiers died; most of whom are buried as unknowns in the Florence National Cemetery.

The idea of building a stockade at Florence, SC began when General Sherman, after capturing Atlanta, posed a great threat towards liberating the Union soldiers held captive at Andersonville and other southern Georgia stockades. It was determined that the prisoners had to be moved out of the path of Sherman's advancing troops. Florence was chosen by Confederate authorities for the site of a new stockade due to the fact that there were three railroads that centered in the town, which would ease the operation of transporting and receiving prisoners.

Major General Samuel Jones ordered Major Frederick F. Warley, who had been recently exchanged from a Northern prison camp, to construct a stockade in Florence. Work began with approximately 1,000 slaves being assigned to the project from the local area.

At Andersonville in late August and early September 1864, thousands of Union prisoners were told by Captain Wirz that they would all be paroled, except for those who could not walk and were unable to travel. The talk of parole was merely a way to keep the prisoners under control and a way of trying to prevent escape during their relocation. The prisoners being relocated were divided into three groups. One group was sent to Savannah, GA, another to Charleston, SC and the last group went directly to Florence, SC. Left behind at Andersonville were those who could not walk and who would be no threat if liberated. Many of these died off rapidly.

Florence Stockcade Most of the prisoners that were sent to Savannah would eventually find themselves back at Andersonville after being held captive in various prisons in Georgia. Although, some of these did end up at Florence. Those that arrived in Charleston were mainly held at the Charleston Race Course, which today is known as Hampton Park. Some were also held in the jailyard of the Charleston City Jail and the Workhouse. All of these were holding areas for the prisoners until the building of the stockade at Florence could be completed. Most, if not all, of the Enlisted prisoners at Charleston were sent to Florence.

During the construction of the stockade, there was a rapidly deteriorating situation in Charleston due to the spread of such diseases as Small Pox & Yellow Fever. Due to this situation, 5 to 6,000 of the prisoners were sent to Florence before the completion of the stockade, arriving in Florence on the 14th of September. Since the stockade was far from complete when the prisoners began to arrive, they were gathered into a field close to the train tracks. Being assembled in an open field made the possibility of escape a reality and was of great concern to Major Warley, not to mention the fact that the prisoners were "in a state of mutiny" and could cause major problems in the surrounding area; including the possible destruction of the railroads. Warley requested assistance from Major General Roswell S. Ripley, the commander at Charleston, to help with the situation. Due to the imminent danger involved, Warley couldn't wait and sent out trains to the surrounding community to gather every available man to assist in the completion of the stockade. The prisoners were finally moved into the stockade on the first Sunday of October 1864.

Florence Stockcade

The design of the stockade was much like that of Andersonville. Upright un-hewn timbers were sunk about 5 feet into the ground encasing about 23 1/2 acres; six of which were swamp. The walls of the stockade were roughly 1,400 by 725 feet and approximately 12 - 16 feet tall. Like Andersonville, a stream (Pie Branch) ran through the center of the stockade. This stream was slightly larger than the one at Andersonville, but still proved to be inadequate.

One major difference in the design changes between Andersonville and Florence is that a deep trench was dug around the Florence Stockade to eliminate prisoners from trying to tunnel out. The soil from the trench was then pushed up against the outer walls of the stockade, which provided a platform for the guards to man their posts and also added stability to the log walls. Some accounts also state that there was an inner trench or furrow, as well as a row of boards, used for the deadline.

An additional difference, in comparing Andersonville to Florence, was that the trees previously within the boundaries of the walls had recently been cut, leaving many stumps behind, which were used as firewood. There were also several smaller trees left inside, which were put to the same use. Also, wood was supplied to the stockade, although in small amounts. This wood was gathered during the winter months by a prisoner wood squad.

Major Warley had been wounded prior to his imprisonment and the building of the Florence Stockade. His wounds began to bother him and he requested to be relieved of his duties at the stockade, being replaced by Colonel George P. Harrison, Jr. of the 32nd GA by the 20th of September, with Lt. James Barrett of the 5th GA in command of the interior of the stockade. Harrison became known for his fair treatment of prisoners. While, on the other hand, Barrett was known for being the most brutal. Many accounts state that Lt. Barrett was far more brutal than Capt. Wirz.

By October 12th of 1864 there were 12,362 prisoners at the stockade, with a death rate of between 20 & 30 per day. At this time, three-fourths of the prisoners were without blankets, and quite a few were close to being naked. Luckily, a supply of goods and clothes were delivered to the stockade from the Sanitary Commission about the middle of October.

Around the first of November, another supply of clothes arrived at the stockade from the Sanitary Commission. These items were dispersed to the prisoners who were in most need of them. Also, around this time, the northwest corner of the stockade was separated from the main part for the construction of a hospital, which consisted of rude barracks.

The prisoners totaled 11,424 for November, and towards the end of the month, orders came to make out parole rolls for the most severely sick and wounded prisoners. Any prisoner wishing to be paroled had to undergo an inspection to determine if his case was severe enough to be paroled.

On December 6, 1864, public criticism led to the appointment of Lieutenant Colonel John F. Iverson as the commander of the stockade. During the first half of December the prisoners who were selected for parole were sent by rail to Charleston where they would stay for a few days before boarding the flag-of-truce boats. After their parole, they were shipped to Camp Parole, Annapolis, Maryland. Due to these paroles the number of prisoners had decreased to 7,538 with the death rate decreasing to 6 per day for January 1865.

Brigadier General John H. Winder, commander of all of the Southern prisons east of the Mississippi, was at Florence when he died of a heart attack in front of the Sutler Tent on February 6th, 1865. Due to an inadequate water supply and its close proximity to Federal cavalry, Winder had been trying to close the stockade at Florence. After Winder's death, Colonel Henry Forno made preparations to have the prisoners relocated. Sherman had cut the last railroad link to southwest Georgia, so it was decided to have the prisoners relocated to North Carolina. After much discussion about what to do with the prisoners, all able-bodied prisoners were sent to Greensboro, where they would be paroled and sent to Camp Parole, Annapolis, MD. Most of the sick and wounded prisoners were sent to N. E. Ferry at Wilmington to be paroled as well. By the end of February 1865, the stockade was empty.

Florence National Cemetery Capt. Wirz was later hung for war crimes related to Andersonville, but Lt. Barrett escaped this same fate by fleeing to Germany where he married and remained many years. He would die later of natural causes in 1910 at Augusta, Georgia.

The Florence Stockade has not received the same notoriety as Andersonville, but the conditions were very much the same. In fact, by many accounts, Florence was worse. It must also be realized that most of the prisoners at Florence had already survived a hard summer at Andersonville and now faced going through the winter with little to no clothing or shelter.

Florence National Cemetery is the smaller of two such shrines in South Carolina; the other is at Beaufort. Located 1/4 mile north of the former site of the Florence Confederate Stockade, the cemetery was created when a plantation owner named James H. Jarrott allowed the dead to be buried in trenches on his property near the camp. The first burial took place on September 17, 1864, and the cemetery was established as a National Cemetery in 1865.

Original interments were made in two separate burial grounds, the largest one containing approximately 2,322 remains. Interments in the larger burial grounds were made in 16 trenches and when the cemeteries were placed under jurisdiction of the federal government, the larger burial ground was designated a National Cemetery. The remains from the small burial ground [416 graves] were reinterred at the National Cemetery, as well as remains moved from Darlington, Cheraw, the Marion Districts and the Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston.

Florena Budwin Gravestone One of the five "known" interments in the trenches is that of Florena Budwin who disguised herself as a man and enlisted in the Union Army in order to follow her husband, a Captain from Pennsylvania. Her husband was killed and Florena was captured. Her identity was finally discovered in the prison stockade at Florence, where she remained to help nurse the prisoners until she became ill and died on January 25, 1865. She is believed to be the first female service member to be buried in a National Cemetery. (She has the only marked grave in Row # 13)

The marker reads:

"On each side of this marker lie the remains of approximately 2300 Union soldiers who died as prisoners in the Florence Prison Stockade, between September 1864 and February 1865. The Stockade was located across Cemetery Street on Stockade Road. Burials are in trenches indicated by stone markers at the end of each row, showing the number of individuals placed there."

Names of those in trench burials were lost after the war but are being researched by the Old Darlington District Chapter, SC Genealogical Society. A current list of known casualties is located on a database in the visitor center for public reference. Signs on Stockade Road indicate the site of the Confederate Stockade. This marker erected by Friends of the Florence Stockade, May 30, 1998.


Florence National Cemetery Marker 1850 Census: Name: Samuel Boatright Date: November 29, 1850 Age: 17 Estimated birth year: abt 1833 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850 (City,County,State): District 16, Henderson County, Tennessee Page: 224 Roll: M432_883 1860 Census: Name: S Boatwright Date: September 18, 1860 Age in 1860: 27 Birthplace: Tennessee Home in 1860: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee Occupation: Farmer Gender: Male Value of real estate: $0 Post Office: Lexington Roll: M653_1256 Page: 327 Year: 1860 Head of Household: S Boatwright Civil War Service Records Name: Samuel Boatwright Company: A Unit: 7 Tennessee Cavalry. Rank - Induction: Private Rank - Discharge: Farrier Allegiance: Union Served with brother Ananias Code No:69574 Grave No: 0 Last Name: Boatright First Name: Samuel Rank: Private Company: A Regiment: 7 State: TN Branch Of Service : Cavalry Date of Death: 10/23/1864 Remarks* Died in prison at Florence, South Carolina, October 23, 1864 Reference: TN ADG RPT: 478 Place Captured: TN ADG RPT: 478 Date Captured: 3/24/1864

Burial: Florence National Cemetery, Florence, Florence County, South Carolina


Notes for NANCY CAROLINE DEROSSETT:

1860 Census:
Name: N C Boatwright
Date: September 18, 1860
Age in 1860: 25
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Lexington
Roll: M653_1256
Page: 327
Year: 1860
Head of Household: S Boatwright
Burial: Oak Grove Cemetery, Henderson County, Tennessee


Children of SAMUEL BOATWRIGHT and NANCY DEROSSETT are:

9-278.    i. M. A. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1855, Henderson County, Tennessee.

9-279.   ii. L. J. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1857, Henderson County, Tennessee.

9-280.  iii. JAMES THOMAS BOATRIGHT, b. 24 Jan 1859, Lexington, Henderson County, 
                                      Tennessee; d. 12 Dec 1935, Portageville, 
                                      New Madrid, Missouri.

8-129. ANANIAS NORRIS BOATWRIGHT (THOMAS8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1835 in Henderson County, Tennessee, and died 27 Jun 1864 in Andersonville, Sumter County, Georgia. He married SARAH A. GARNER Abt. 1860 in Henderson County, Tennessee, daughter of CULLEN GARNER and RACHEL. She was born 1846 in Tennessee.


Notes for ANANIAS NORRIS BOATWRIGHT:

Ananias served in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry (Union). Ananias died at Andersonville Prison Camp, Andersonville, Georgia on June 27, 1864, two months after arriving at the camp.

Andersonville cemetery: Andersonville cemetery: Andersonville cemetery:

Grave No: 2555
Last Name: Boatwright
First Name: Ananias
Rank: Sergeant
Company: A
Regiment: 7
State: Tennessee
Branch Of Service : Cavalry
Date of Death: 6/27/1864
Cause of Death: Diarrhea
Place Captured: Union City, Tennessee
Date Captured: 3/24/1864
Status: Died at Andersonville

Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many established prison camps during the American Civil War. It was built early in 1864 after Confederate officials decided to move the large number of Federal prisoners kept in and around Richmond, Virginia, to a place of greater security and a more abundant food supply.

The pen initially covered about 16 1/2 acres of land enclosed by a 15 foot high stockade of hewn pine logs. It was enlarged to 26 1/2 acres in June of 1864. The stockade was in the shape of a parallelogram 1,620 feet long and 779 feet wide. Sentry boxes, or "pigeon roost" as the prisoners called them, stood at 30 yard intervals along the top of the stockade. Inside, about 19 feet from the wall, was the " DEADLINE ," which the prisoners were forbidden to cross upon threat of death. Flowing through the prison yard was a stream called Stockade Branch, which supplied water to most of the prison.

Andersonville Prison:

Two entrances, the North Gate and the South Gate, were on the West side of the stockade. Eight small earthen forts located around the exterior of the prison were equipped with artillery to quell disturbances within the compound and to defend against feared Union cavalry attacks. The first prisoners were brought to Andersonville in February, 1864. During the next few months approximately 400 more arrived each day until, by the end of June, some 26,000 men were confined in a prison area originally intended to hold 13,000. (Source: Kevin Frye: Frye@pstel.net)

Andersonville Prison: Andersonville Prison:


THE SEVENTH TENNESSEE VOLUNTEER CAVALRY
WEST TENNESSEE UNIONISTS IN ANDERSONVILLE PRISON
BY PEGGY SCOTT HOLLEY

The Confederacy established Andersonville, that most infamous of Civil War prisons, in late February, 1864. It built a stockade in west central Georgia to accommodate approximately 10,000 prisoners of war. As the fighting moved ever deeper into the South in the last year of the war, the expanded stockade at one point held nearly 33,000 Union soldiers. The termination by the North of the prisoner of war exchanges which had existed previously and the continually depleting resources of the Confederacy left these prisoners stranded in miserable conditions.

By the end of the war, 13,000 of the total 45,000 prisoners had died. They were buried in shallow trench graves with numbers to identify the dead. The northern states erected large memorial monuments of the site of the prison after the war to honor their citizens who died there. Tennessee also built a monument to commemorate the more than 750 men from Tennessee who died there. The suffering of these men was recognized even though they did not support the decision of the state to join the Confederacy.

About half of the Tennesseans in Andersonville were from East Tennessee. The mountain area of eastern Tennessee had been unsympathetic to the southern case. Mountain people were often unwilling to fight to preserve a plantation economy in which they did not participate. Furthermore, many were also stauchly Unionist. Several Union regiments had been raised in the east including the 2nd Tennessee Infantry, which had 475 of its men captured at Rogersville, Tennessee and sent to Andersonville Prison.

The West Tennessee Unionists in Andersonville, however, were not mountaineers but were farmers from a cotton growing area of small farms and plantations. The largest number of West Tennesseans, about 450, were from the 7th Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry (including both Ananias and brother Samuel) The entire regiment, except for one group on scout was captured at Union City, Tennessee on March 24, 1864 by a detachment of Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest's regiment under the command of Col. William L. Duckworth. The captured men were mainly from Carroll, Henderson and McNairy Counties with some recruits from Henry, Weakley, Benton, Madison, Gibson, Hardin, and Decatur counties. These men suffered horribly during the time they were prisoners. Two-thirds of them died within a year of the capture. Their high mortality rate can be attibuted both to the prison to which they were sent and to the actions of their captors.

One group within the captors of the 7th Tennessee Cavalry USA was the 7th Tennessee Cavalry CSA. Both groups were primarily West Tennesseans and there was intense ill feeling between them. Some men were neighbors and personally knew each other. For the 7th Tennessee USA, the humiliation was almost total. Colonel Duckworth tricked them into surrender when help was nearby. And, it was the second time that Forrest's men had forced them to surrender. The first time at Trenton in December, 1862, they had been paroled and had spent their time at Camp Chase, Ohio. Some members of the regiment, who were captured at Ripley and Mt. Pinson, Tennesse, had even spent a short time in Richmond, Virginia in 1863 before being parolled once again. By March 1864, however, the Lincoln government had stopped the exchanges. This time there would be no paroles. The men were prisoners of the Confederacy and were destined for Andersonville Prison.

The captors "had a lot of fun" at the expense of their prisoners because of the circumstances of the surrender. They taunted the "Tennessee Yanks" for giving up without a fight. John Milton Hubbard, who was one of the privates among Forrest's men that day, later wrote that the men of the Seventh Tennessee USA "bore up manfully and turned out to be jolly good fellows, molded much after the pattern of the men of our own Seventh Tennessee Confederate." He even called Lt. Colonel Isaac R. Hawkins, a Huntingdon lawyer in command of the regiment,"that most gentlemanly Federal officer."

After sacking and burning the fort and destroying all the regiment's books and papers, the Confederates hurriedly left Union City with their prisoners. The Union enlisted men walked four abreast with the Confederate guard in a single file on each side. Under a light rain, the men marched about sixteen miles to Gardners's Station, where they camped for the night. Two officers, including Colonel Hawkins' son, escaped during the night. Later during the trip south, five more Union Officers escaped. At least some of the officers violated their parole of honor by doing so. This made General Forrest so furious that he made Colonel Hawkins and the other officers walk for a time in ankle deep mud.

Leaving Gardner's Station at daybreak, the men marched to Trenton, arriving there on the 26th of March. Their captors gave them almost nothing to eat during the trip but they were able to buy biscuits for five dollars per dozen and baked chickens for five dollars each from the people of Trenton. It was fortunate they could spend some of their money. On the next day the Confederate soldiers took them into the courthouse and robbed them. Since the men had recently been paid their back pay, the captors were able to take a sizeable amount of money from them as well as other personal articles. Even Colonel Hawkins lost his saddle bags, extra clothes, and blanket around this time.

Colonel Hawkins protested the robberies to Colonel Duckwork. Duckworth said that Forrest's men were responsible and that he would put his own men on guard to stop them. When the thefts continued, Hawkins again protested to Duckworth and was told that an account was being taken of the money involved and that it would be returned. Both sides sometimes confiscated money from prisoners in order to prevent bribery. The money would then be given back to its owner in small amounts at the prison or in a lump sum when the prisoner was exchanged. In this case, however, the money was taken unofficiallly by the enlisted men and was never returned. In the terms of the capitulation signed by both Hawkins and Duckworth at Union City, it had been agreed that all private property belonging to the men would be respected. Only their horses, horse equipment, and arms were to be taken from them. This breach of the surrender terms by Forrest's men later caused much misery and even death for many of Hawkins's men.

On the 28th of March the group arrived at Humboldt. A citizen there, seeing Colonel Hawkins' predicament, took pity on him and gave him two pairs of socks and a handkerchief. Their next stop was Jackson, where they joined Forrest's main force. Here James McCree, a citizen Unionist, sent a dispatch to the Federal command on the Tennessee River suggesting that Forrest, and his prisoners might be intercepted on their way south after leaving Jackson. Forrest suspected McCree, arrested him, and would have hanged him except for the intervention of certain Jackson citizens, who felt McCree might be innocent. After a few days at Jackson, the prisoners were moved on to near Purdy. The captives hoped that there might be a rescue attempt by Union troops before the group crossed the Tennessee line. General Forrest, anticipationg trouble, gave orders that if an attempt was made, the prisoners were to be shot. No help materialized, however. After crossing the Tennessee line south of Pocahontas, the men entered into northern Mississippi at Ripley, and later were sent on to Ellistown and Tupelo.

About a month after the prisoners had gone through Tupelo, another group of Union sympathizers from the same area of West Tennessee as the prisoners were marched through the town. They were private citizens who had been rounded up in Huntingdon and were being escorted to prison. John A. Crutchfield, a lieutenant in the 20th Tennessee Cavalry CSA, wrote about them in a letter to his wife in Macedonia, Carroll Co: "I saw some of our Huntingdon Union Friends footeling it the other Day towards Dici. One certain old man John Britt and several other I new, Citizens they all were. I was sorry for them, it looked evil to march men off from their Homes in that way even if they was Union. Old Johnny Britt looked pitiful."

John Britt was a Huntingdon merchant who had three sons in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry USA. At least one of these sons was with the Union City prisoners. Crutchfield's letter also mentioned that he had heard that Isaac Hawkins' men were safe at Mobile, Alabama. This was indeed where they had been taken.

Presumably the men walked until they intersected the Mobile and Ohio Railroad somewhere near Tupelo, Mississippi. On the way to Mobile, two men died of Pneumonia and a rebel guard accidentally shot one prisoner in the abdomen at Okalona, Mississippi. When they reach Mobile they were placed in a warehouse. Private Isaac Davenport, from Scotts' Hill in Henderson County, later described the place as "a cotton shed where the fleas and body lice sucked some of the very life blood out" of them and where they were much too "numbered" for the space. Ten men died in Mobile. Davenport had to leave his dying brother-in-law, Sam McCollum, when orders came to ship out.

The prisoners left Mobile by steamer about April 17 for Tensaw, Alabama. Leaving Tensaw on the 18th, they left by rail on the Mobile and Great Northern Railroad for Pollard. Camping there for the night, they would then have needed to change to the Alabama and Florida Railroad(Alabama) to ride to Montgomery, where they arrived on the 19th. Leaving Mongomery the next morning, they crossed into Georgia at Columbus, where they once again changed trains. Traveling all night on the South Western Railroad, the men arrived at Andersonville Prison at 8 a.m. on the 21st of April, 1864. The trip from Union City had required just under a month.

Colonel Hawkins and about ten commissioned officers were separated from the privates and noncommissioned officers at this time and put on a train for Macon, Georgia. Their arrival at the prison in Macon brought the number of officers there to a total of fifty. All of the commissioned officers of the 7th Tennessee Cavalry survived their imprisonment except for Captain M. Wesley Derryberry of Co. H. Two lieutenants, William W. Murray of Co. I and John J Wallace of Co. K, even managed to escape and both safely reached Union lines. Colonel Hawkins remained in southern prisons for only five months before being exchanged. The enlisted men who survived Andersonville averaged eight to thirteen months before their releases.

Camp Sumter, the official name for Andersonville, had opened a little over two months before the 7th Tennessee arrived. At the time of their arrival the stockade held about 15,000 prisoners or about 50 percent more than it had been designed to hold. Private Isaac Davenport described his first impression. He thought it a "despert looking place" and "very gloomy." Robert Kellogg, a Connecticut soldier speaking for some 2000 soldiers who arrived about twelve days later, said that the sight froze their blood with horror, and made their hearts fail within them. Sergeant Henry M. Davidson of the 1st Ohio Light Artillery, who was an inmate at the prison, remembered the arrival of Hawkins' Regiment and wrote the following in his memoirs:
"Some five hundred Tennesseans, who had been captured by Forrest---arrived among us; the most of who were hatless, bootless, and shoeless, without coats, pants and blankets...They were wholly destitute of cups, plates, spoons, and dishes of every kind as well as of all means of purchasing them; they having been stripped of these things by their captors. In their destitute condition they were turned into the stockage and left to shift for themselves in the best manner they could. To borrow cups of the fellow-prisoners was in impossibility, for no one could be expected to lend what, if it were not returned, would insure his own destruction, particularly when the borrower was an utter stranger; there was nothing left for them but to bake their raw meal and bacon upon stones and chips, eat it without moisture, and afterward to go to the brook like beasts to quench their thirst."

Andersonville Prison: Andersonville Prison:

The men also lived with little protection from the elements since no tents were issued. Sergeant Davidson said that the 7th Tennessee "scooped out shallow places in the earth with their hands, and lying down side by side in these, with their bare heads and naked feet resting upon the surface of the ground, and their unprotected bodies wet with dews and storms, the wretched men trembled and shivered till morning. Members of the regiment later confirmed this in their answers to a Civil War questionnaire. Private William Douglas wrote that they "slept on the ground, nothing under us or over...we didn't have any cloth." Private William T. Woods said "we suffered greatly from exposure." Private Isaac Davenport said in his memoir that their "beds was only the sandy hills...we slept exposed"

Even allowing for a certain amount of exaggeration, the men of the 7th Tennessee arrived at a distinct disadvantage since they had no money to bargain with their fellow prisoners or with the Confederate guards or to buy from the prison sutler. Also, as noted above, their blankets, cooking utensils, and clothing either had been taken from them by their captors or had been thrown away because of the burden of the long forced marches. They did not even have enough cloth to make crude tents to protect themselves from the elements. However, some Confederate soldiers respected the private property of their captives. For example, the Union regiments captured at Plymouth, North Carolina retained their money and their private property. Robert Kellogg, a member of the Plymouth captives, said that they were allowed to retain their blankets, overcoats, and all they had with them except their arms and equipment. He reported only one robbery, and that by an intoxicated officer. He praised the 35th North Carolina as a gentlemanly set of guards. When these captives reached Andersonville, about twelve days after the 7th Tennessee had arrived, Sergeant Davidson could not help noticing the contrast between the appearances of the two sets of prisoners. Nearly every one of the Plymouth captives had an overcoat, extra pants, shirts, drawers, blankets, and money with which to negotiate. Money to buy food from the sutler would have been expecially helpful since the food supplied in the prison camp was never adequate. James Taylor of Buena Vista in Carroll County said that the food supply for twentyfour hours was about half what a man ordinarily had for one meal. William Douglas, son of a Henderson County planter, must have referred only to the vegetable ration when he said he ate "1 spoonful Bow peas a day." William Wood from Darden in Henderson County said he suffered "starvation." Joseph McCracken, son of the major of Huntingdon, weighed 150 pounds when he arrived at Andersonville and only 75 pounds at his release. Isaac Davenport wrote "our flesh bein reducd we were nothin but skelingtons." Southern apologists have made much of the fact that the rations were the same as were being supplied to the Confederate army and to the guards at the prison. They overlook, however, the opportunities that free men have to supplement their rations.

The prisoners themselves found one opportunity to supplement their diet. They reportedly ate a dog that had wandered into the stockade. Several versions of the story exist and continue to be told by West Tennessee descendants at present. It is even said that a bone of that dog was brought back to Carroll County by Daniel J. Meals of Co.A. The bone is thought to still be retained by a family member.

Only eight days after their arrival, inadequate food, overcrowding, and exposure, both on the trip South and after their arrival at the camp, had begun to take their toll on the West Tennesseans. The first deaths at Andersonville occurred on April 29 when twenty-eight year old Private Jacson J. Hays of Henderson County died of chronic diarrhea and twenty year old Sergeant George Pickens of McNairy County died of Dysentery.

The regiment's first full month in prison resulted in six more deaths, three of which were from pneumonia. By the end of the second month, sixteen more had died (including Ananias). Fourteen of these died from diarrhea. Both rebel administrators and northern inmates thought that one cause of diarrhea in the camp was that the northern digestive system was unaccustomed to corn meal. The West Tennesseans, however, were accustomed to eating corn meal and were hit very had. Diarrhea was the number one killer among the 7th Tennessee during their captivity. It was listed as the cause of death for ninety men.

The first two months were also difficult because of the "Raiders," a lawless group among the prisoners who prayed on the other inmates, and because of the increased population in the prison. By the end of June the number of men being retained was approximately 23,000. This was over twice the number which the stockade had been built to accomodate.

July, however, began on a hopeful note. An addition to the stockade helped alleviate the overcrowded conditions and a combined force of prison authorities and inmates captured the Raiders and hanged their leaders. An internal police force was then formed among the prisoners to keep order. Also there were rumors that an exchange had been arranged for the 7th of July. There was no exchange, however, and more prisoners arrived to overcrowd the prison once again. The temperature and the death rate began to soar. By the end of the month the 7th Tennessee had lost twenty-six more men. This brought the total number of deaths since capture to about sixty-three or approximately one out of seven.

Near the end of July, the increasing number of deaths, and overall prison conditions led to the circulation of a petition to the United States Government. The petitioner begged President Lincoln to take some action to effect either parole or exchange for the men at Andersonville. The petition was signed by more than one hundred sergeants who were in charge of detachments and who had presumably polled their men. From the 7th Tennessee, Sergeants John M. Rhodes of Co. A and Rufus G. Barker of Co. H signed. The Confederate authorities released a delegation of prisoners to take the petition to Washington. Though it gained much sympathy for the prisoners among the Northern press and citizenry, the government never acted on it.

August began with terrible rainstorms which drenched the unprotected prisoners. Two pleasant side effects, however, were that the downpours washed some of the filth from the camp and one especially hard rain revealed a spring of fresh water which had been covered up in the building of the stockade. This spring was especially welcome since the one sluggish stream flowing through the camp was by this time extremely polluted. The spring would afterward be called "Providence Spring" and would be remembered fondly by the men from West Tennessee. This "miracle" was considered by many men to be the answer to prayer and is thought to be the beginning of a fifty year preaching career for twenty year old John B. Hayes of Decatur County.

By the end of August 1864, the camp held about 32,000 men. New prisoners arrived almost continuously from General Sherman's army after Sherman had entered Georgia. They brought the good news that the Union was winning battles in Tennessee and northern Georgia. The camp, however, was experiencing its most disasterous month. Nearly 3000 men died, or an average of almost 100 per day. By the end of the month the 7th Tennessee had lost forty-four more men. This brought their losses since capture to nearly 24 percent, or almost one out of every four.

In order to cope with seeing so many of his regiment sick and dying, Private Davenport met together with some of his Henderson County neighbors who were also prisoners. They helped each other as much as they could with what little they had. They brought water to the sick, attempted to keep the flies off of them, and tried to encourage them. They talked about home and friends and how they would like to be back home. They sang, told jokes, and walked around the camp to exercise and to see what was happening.

On the 6th of September several detachments were told to be ready for departure on the 7th. The explanation given was that they were to be exchanged. The real reason for removal, however, was that Sherman had captured Atlanta and it was feared that the Union Army would attempt to liberate Andersonville. Departures from the camp continued through October. The men soon realized that the trains only moved them to smaller prisons in Charleston, Florence (including Ananias' brother, Samuel), and Columbia, South Carolina and Savannah, Blacksheare, Millen, and Thomasville, Georgia. Conditions were somewhat better in these prisons or at least they were not as crowded. Also there were more chances for escape enroute to these prisons and several of the West Tennesseans took advantage of their opportunities.

Members of the 7th Tennessee were both among those moved to the smaller prisons and among those who remained at Andersonville. The number of inmates at Andersonville was reduced from about 33,000 in August to about 2,000 in November. Those left behind were usually too sick to move. This accounts for the continuing high number of deaths at Andersonville. In September the 7th Tennessee lost fifty-two men at Andersonville and seven more in the smaller prisons. This total of fifty-nine deaths in one month made September the most disasterous single month for the regiment. August, and October were next with forty-four deaths each. In October, thirty-six of the deaths were at Andersonville and eight (including Samuel Boatwright) in the smaller prisons. By the end of October, the death rate since capture had reached 48 percent, or nearly one out of every two men.

During the period from November through January 1865, sixteen more died in the smaller camps and sixteen more died in Andersonville. Twelve of the latter sixteen were listed as having died of scorbutus, a disease presently called scurvy and caused by poor diet. Seventy-four men had it listed as the cause of death making it the second highest killer among the 7th Tennessee. Diarrhea and scorbutus together were blamed for about 56 percent of the total deaths. Cause of death was not given for 19 percent of the men. The other 25 percent was divided among dysentery, typhus, stroke, pneumonia, and edena, etc. Two men at Andersonville died of gunshot wounds-perhaps they had ventured too close to the stockade wall and were shot by the Confederate guards.

The year 1865 began for the 7th Tennessee with four more deaths in January and eleven more in February. One of the eleven people who died in February was Riley Powers of Henderson County, the fourth member of the Middleburg Powers family to die at Andersonville. His brother, Joe, and his cousin Henry M. had died in October and his cousin, Willis, brother to Henry, had died in June. A fifth member, John, died on his way home. Since Civil War companies were ofter composed of relatives and neighbors, many families and communities were eventually devastated after a company had been captured. The 16th district of Henderson County, which had only eighty-three households in 1850, lost at least twenty-two men at Andersonville and the smaller prisons.

The beginning of 1865 also brought an increase in the number of prisoners at Andersonville. Cavalry raids in the vicinity of the Thomasville, Georgia prison caused the Confederate authorities to move about 3500 men back to Andersonville. Private Davenport, who was a member of this group, later said that the men were told that they were about to be released. The marched happily on foot about forty miles from Thomasville to Albany, Georgia where they were put on a train. To their horror in a few hours they found themselves back in Andersonville Prison.

Perhaps it was the discouragement among the Thomasville returnees that caused seventeen members of the 7th Tennessee to take the oath of allegiance to the Confederacy. They left the prison with the rebel recruiter, a Colonel O'Neill, on February 28 to join the Confederate Army. There were also 121 others recruited among the prison inmates at this time. The recruits were attached to rebel troops who were attempting to defend southwest Georgia from Union troops threatening from Florida and Alabama. Recruiting was a regular feature in the stockade but only three men from the 7th Tennessee are known to have gone over to the enemy in the previous ten months of imprisonment.

Southern Union soldiers must have been a prime target for the rebel recruiters since it would have seemed easier for them to change their allegiance to the Confederacy than for northerners. None of the "Galvanized Yanks," as the new recruits were called, could really be trusted, however. Many joined only for a chance to escape. At least three of the seventeen February recruits "deserted" the rebels and eventuallly reached Union lines where they "rejoined" the Union Army.

It would also be expected that southern Unionist prisoners who held to their convictions would be especially resented by their guards. Warren Goss, a Massachusetts soldier at Andersonville and later Florence, mentioned in his memoir that Colonel Iverson, who was in charge of the Florence prison, was very vindictive and harsh to southern Union men. He often called them"d--d traitors" and asked them why they were fighting against "their country." Iverson, however, was considered by northern prisoners to be one of the kindest of the prison commanders.

Though it was unknown to the prisoners who were not involved, paroles and prisoners exchanges had commenced again about two months after the removal of the majority of the men from Andersonville to the smaller prisons. The first group exchanged left by steamer from Savannah, Georgia in mid-November, 1864. Another group left from Charleston, South Carolina about the middle of December, another from Wilmington, North Carolina at the beginning of March. One group went west to Vicksburg, Mississippi during late March and April. The last group was released to Jacksonville, Florida on April 28, 1865, nineteen days after Lee surrendered at Appomattox. The sharp decline in the number of deaths during this period reflects not only that fewer men were being held but also that complete records do not exist for the smaller prisons.

Since the men had been told that they were being exchanged each time they were moved to another prison, most were skeptical when their paroles were announced. Almost all the prison memoirs says that the men cried when they finally saw "Old Glory" and knew that the exchange was real.

The first thing the former prisoners asked for was food. They had had so little to eat in the last year, however, that eating was dangerous. Elias Goff of Co.K, a citizen of Scotts Hill in Henderson County, died suddenly after his release from Millen Prison when sympathetic citizens gave him a big meal. The U.S. military authorities tried to prevent overeating by issuing small amounts of food to the men several times a day. A bath and an issue of clean clothes was their next request. The condition of the men's clothes, as well as the presence of vermin, necessitated that the clothes be burned or thrown out to sea. The assertion of Lieutenant Asa B. Isham of the 7th Michigan Cavalry that the ocean turned grey with lice is rather unbelievable. However, picking the lice from clothing seems to have been a regular morning ritual in all the prison camps.

After their release, the former prisoners who were freed on the east coast were generally sent by steamer to an army hospital in Annapolis, Maryland. Some were too ill to survive the voyage and died on the boat. Nineteen year-old Isaac Reed of Co. A died on the transport Northern Lights and was buried at sea the same day. Some of the men who were released from Andersonville went by train to Jackson, Mississippi and then over to Vicksburg. There they boarded steamers which took them up the Mississippi River to Jefferson Barracks, Missouri or to Camp Chase, Ohio. Ten members of the 7th Tennessee were unfortunate to be aboard the illfated steamer Sultana. When the ship exploded just above Memphis, eight were killed and the other two rescued only after a terrifying night clinging to debris in the water.

Many of the men remained in hospitals for months. Eight died in the hospital at Annapolis. Those well enough to be discharged from the hospital were given thirty days leave. Three died on leave, one on a train on his way home. Most were given individual discharges. Those few who eventually returned to the regiment were mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee on August 9, 1865.

About 66 percent of the enlisted men, or two out of every three who had been captured at Union City that day in March of 1864, never made it home. Two hundred and seven died at Andersonville, sixteen at Millen, twelve at Savannah, ten at Mobile, seven at Florence, eight on the Sultana, four at Charleston, seventeen in northern hospitals, seven enroute to and from various prisons or hospitals, two on furlough, and one at an unknown place. This total of 291 includes only those for whom we have records. It does not include those who died from prison related illnesses after their discharges. Also, many more men were partially disabled for the rest of their lives.

According to Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-65, the 7th Tennessee Cavalry USA was one of the four regiments in the Union army with the largest number of prison deaths. Only two New York regiments and the 2nd Tennessee Infantry, the other large group of Tennesseans in Andersonville, had a higher prison mortality rate.

The end of the war did not erase the bitterness caused by the 7th Tennessee's experiences. Thiry years after the war when one of Forrest's men was called to be minister of the Bethel Baptist Church in Carroll County, one of the former prisoners at Andersonville protested. He was admonished to forgive as Jesus did. Alfred D. Bennet of Huntingdon replied "the Lord was just crucified, he never had to go to Andersonville Prison".

Fifty years after the war, Don Hampton of Carroll County told his grandchildren that he had grown up grandfatherless because the "Democrats" came and took his grandfather to prison. Well over one hundred years after the Civil War, the area from which the 7th Tennessee was recruited remains a Republican stronghold where nearly every family can tell at least one Andersonville story.


The above article was printed in the West Tennessee Historical Society Papers and was written by Peggy Scott Holley, a history instructor at Austin Community College. The complete article with source references and deaths listed among the 7th Tennessee Cavalry after their capture can be found in the 1988 issue of the West Tenn Historical Society Papers, Vol XLII.


Two of the most common questions I hear in the cemetery are "Because the headstones are so close together, are they symbolic or the actual graves?" and "How do they know who is buried where?"

Andersonville Burials There was a fellow prisoner named Dorence Atwater who was a close friend of the first one who died (Adam Swarner) and he volunteered to keep the records. He wanted to make sure that those who died here were remembered and so the families would know the fate and burial place of their loved ones. When the dead were brought out of the stockade to the "Deadhouse" they were brought by friends who knew them. They would report what was known about the dead man such as name, State, Regiment, date of death, cause, etc. Atwater recorded them numerically and attached a tag to the body which matched the number in the records. The dead then were taken to the cemetery where the first dozen were buried in pine boxes, however since the numbers dying each day was growing so fast, and limited resources, the dead were stripped naked so the living could use what the dead no longer needed. The bodies were then laid in trench type graves dug 4 feet deep and long enough for 150 to 200 bodies and shoulder to shoulder without coffins.

With the lack of resources to make grave markers, there was a small post placed at the head of each grave with a number carved into it. This number matched the one on the body tag, which matched Atwaters records.

When Dorence Atwater and Miss Clara Barton returned after the war to establish the new National Cemetery in July 1865, they simply had to match the numbers on the post with the copy of the list that Atwater smuggled out when he was exchanged. This way, the identified graves show exactly who is buried where. The post were replaced with wooden headboards.

In 1878, the wooden boards were replaced by the first set of stones which were plain smooth stones with the name and grave number.

In 1898 when the US Government finally got around to establishing a standard grave marker for Union soldiers, there were new stones placed in 1898-1899 to replace the first stones. These stones now are the ones that mark the graves. So you see, each time the replaced the marker with a new one, it was easy enough to know who was buried where. Those who are buried as unknown will remain as such because there will be no way for anyone but God to know who lies beneith the unknown stones.
(Source: Kevin Frye, Frye@pstel.net)

1850 Census:
Name: Norris Boatright
Date: November 29, 1850
Age: 14
Estimated birth year: abt 1836
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 16, Henderson County, Tennessee
Page: 224
Roll: M432_883

1860 Census:
Name: A Boatwright
Date: September 18, 1860
Age in 1860: 25
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Lexington
Roll: M653_1256
Page: 327
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Tm Boatwright

U.S. Veterans Gravesites, ca.1775-2006
Name: Ananias Boatwright
Service Info.: SGT A 7 TENN CAV
Death Date: 27 Jun 1864
Cemetery: Andersonville National Historical Site
Cemetery Address: Route 1, Box 800 Andersonville, GA 31711
Buried At: Site 2555

Notes for SARAH A. GARNER:

It is my "best guess" that Sarah was the wife of Ananias - George Boatright.

1860 Census:
Name: S A Garner 
Date: September 18, 1860
Age in 1860: 14 
Birth Year: abt 1846 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Home in 1860: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee 
Gender: Female 
Post Office: Lexington 
Census Place: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee; 
Roll M653_1256; Page: 326; Image: 297; 
Family History Library Film: 805256.

1870 Census:
Name: Sarah L J Boatright 
Date: August 22, 1870
Birth Year: abt 1846 
Age in 1870: 24 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Home in 1870: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Post Office: Lexington 
Census Place: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee; 
Roll M593_1537; Page: 189A; Image: 364; 
Family History Library Film: 553036.
Living with parents

1880 Census:
Name: Sarah Boatright
Date: June 5, 1880
Home in 1880: Benton, Dallas, Missouri 
Age: 35 
Estimated birth year: abt 1845 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Relation to Head of Household: Daughter 
Father's birthplace: Carolina 
Mother's Name: Rachel 
Mother's birthplace: Kentucky 
Occupation: Works In House 
Marital Status: Widowed 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Census Place: Benton, Dallas, Missouri; 
Roll T9_684; Family History Film: 1254684; Page: 332.4000; 
Enumeration District: 26; Image: 0328.
living with mother

1900 Census:
Name: Sarah Boatwright 
Date: June 14, 1900
Home in 1900: Center, Hickory, Missouri 
Age: 55 
Birth Date: Jul 1844 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Relationship to Head of House: Mother 
Father's Birthplace: N Carolina 
Mother's Birthplace: Kentucky 
Mother: number of living children: 4 
Mother: How many children: 6 
Marital Status: Widowed 
Residence : Center Township, Hickory, Missouri 
Census Place: Center, Hickory, Missouri; 
Roll T623_858; Page: 7A; 
Enumeration District: 94.


Children of ANANIAS BOATWRIGHT and SARAH GARNER are:

9-280A.   i. WILLIAM I. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1861, Henderson County, Tennessee.

9-280B.  ii. MARGARET A. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1863, Henderson County, Tennessee.

8-130. GEORGE W. BOATWRIGHT (THOMAS8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1840 in Henderson County, Tennessee, and died 14 May 1924 in Savannah, Hardin County, Tennessee. He married MOLLIE. She was born 1852 in Tennessee.


Notes for GEORGE W. BOATWRIGHT:

See link for copy of death certificate.

1850 Census:
Name: George W Boatright
Date: November 29, 1850
Age: 10
Estimated birth year: abt 1840
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 16, Henderson County, Tennessee
Page: 224
Roll: M432_883

1860 Census:
Name: G W Boatwright
Date: September 18, 1860
Age in 1860: 20
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Lexington
Roll: M653_1256
Page: 327
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Tm Boatwright

1900 Census:
Name: Geo W Boatright 
Date: June 19, 1900
Home in 1900: Civil District 4, Hardin, Tennessee 
Age: 52 
Birth Date: Feb 1848 
Birthplace: Illinois 
Race: White 
Gender: Male 
Relationship to Head of House: Head 
Spouse's name: Mollie 
Marriage Year: 1867 
Marital Status: Married 
Years Married: 33 
Occupation: Farm Hand
Residence : Civil District 4 (South Part), Hardin, Tennessee 
Census Place: Civil District 4, Hardin, Tennessee; 
Roll T623_1576; Page: 13A; 
Enumeration District: 33.

1910 Census:
Name: George W Boatwright
Date: May 2, 1910
Age in 1910: 67 
Estimated birth year: abt 1843 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Relation to Head of House: Head 
Father's Birth Place: Alabama 
Mother's Birth Place: Tennessee 
Home in 1910: Civil District 4, Hardin, Tennessee 
Marital Status: Widowed 
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White 
Gender: Male 
Census Place: Civil District 4, Hardin, Tennessee; 
Roll T624_1504; Page: 14A; 
Enumeration District: 75; Image: 696.

1920 Census:
Name: George W Boatright 
Date: February 11, 1920
Home in 1920: Civil District 4, Hardin, Tennessee 
Age: 78 years  
Estimated birth year: abt 1842 
Birthplace: Alabama 
Relation to Head of House: Father 
Father's Birth Place: United States of America 
Mother's Birth Place: United States of America 
Marital Status: Widow 
Race: White 
Sex: Male 
Able to read: No 
Able to Write: No 
Census Place: Civil District 4, Hardin, Tennessee; 
Roll T625_1744; Page: 22B; 
Enumeration District: 75; Image: 983.
living with son Lee and family

Tennessee, Death Records, 1908-1958 
Name: George Boatright 
Gender: Male 
Birth Date: abt 1841 
Birth Place: Alabama 
Age: 83 
Death Date: 14 May 1924 
Death Place: Savannah, Hardin, Tennessee 
Certificate Number: 313 

Notes for MOLLIE:
1900 Census:
Name: Mollie Boatright 
Date: June 19, 1900
Home in 1900: Civil District 4, Hardin, Tennessee 
Age: 48 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Relationship to Head of House: Wife 
Father's Birthplace: Tennessee 
Mother's Birthplace: Tennessee 
Mother: number of living children: 4 
Mother: How many children: 8 
Spouse's name: Geo W 
Marriage Year: 1867 
Marital Status: Married 
Years Married: 33 
Residence : Civil District 4 (South Part), Hardin, Tennessee 
Census Place: Civil District 4, Hardin, Tennessee; 
Roll T623_1576; Page: 13A; 
Enumeration District: 33.


Child of GEORGE BOATWRIGHT and MOLLIE is:

9-280C.    i. JENNIE BOATRIGHT, b. Oct 1888, Tennessee;

9-280D.   ii. LEE BOATRIGHT, b. 11 Mar 1893, Tennessee;
                              d. Apr 1971 in Savannah, Hardin County, Tennessee.

8-131. CHARLES M. BOATWRIGHT (THOMAS8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1843 in Henderson County, Tennessee.


Notes for CHARLES M. BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Charles Boatright
Date: November 29, 1850
Age: 6
Estimated birth year: abt 1844
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 16, Henderson County, Tennessee
Page: 224
Roll: M432_883

1860 Census:
Name: C M Boatwright
Date: September 18, 1860
Age in 1860: 17
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Lexington
Roll: M653_1256
Page: 327
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Tm Boatwright

8-132. NANCY M. BOATWRIGHT (THOMAS8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1846 in Henderson County, Tennessee.


Notes for NANCY M. BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Nancy M Boatright
Date: November 29, 1850
Age: 4
Estimated birth year: abt 1846
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 16, Henderson County, Tennessee
Page: 224
Roll: M432_883

1860 Census:
Name: N M Boatwright
Date: September 18, 1860
Age in 1860: 14
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: District 20, Henderson, Tennessee
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Lexington
Roll: M653_1256
Page: 327
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Tm Boatwright

8-133. JOSEPH BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1821 in Tennessee, and died Bef. 1830 in Missouri.



8-134. ELIZABETH BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 07 Jun 1825 in Henderson County, Tennessee, and died 29 Jul 1913 in Marshall, Saline County, Missouri. She married WILLIAM KEYTON 1842 in Saline County, Missouri. He was born in Virginia.


Notes for ELIZABETH BOATRIGHT:

Burial: Ridge Park Cemetery of Marshall, Saline County, Missouri


Children of ELIZABETH BOATRIGHT and WILLIAM KEYTON are:

        i. JOHN KEYTON, b. 1843.

       ii. HENRY KEYTON, b. 1846.

8-135. MARGARET D. BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1827 in Illinois, and died 1884 in Marshall, Saline County, Missouri. She married JAMES MILTON SMITH 29 Mar 1849 in Saline County, Missouri. He was born 1829 in Virginia, and died 1853 in Saline County, Missouri.


Notes for MARGARET D. BOATRIGHT:

1860 Census:
Name: Margaret Smith
Date: August 1860
Age in 1860: 32
Birthplace: Illinois
Home in 1860: Miami, Saline County, Missouri
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M653_645
Page: 0
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Jacob Boatright


Children of MARGARET BOATRIGHT and JAMES SMITH are:

        i. ROBERT W. SMITH, b. 08 Sep 1851, Saline County, Missouri; 
                             d. 04 Feb 1931, Warrensburg, Johnson
                             County, Missouri.
       ii. JAMES MILTON SMITH, b. May 1854, Saline County, Missouri.

8-136. WILLIAM GREENE BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 24 Jan 1830 in Boone County, Missouri, and died 27 Jan 1921 in Herndon, Saline County, Missouri. He married NANCY FRANCES "FANNIE" BUIE 22 Oct 1857 in Sweet Springs, Saline County, Missouri, daughter of DANIEL BUIE and NANCY BLAKELY. She was born 16 Jan 1839 in Marshall, Saline County, Missouri, and died 29 Dec 1914 in Herndon, Saline County, Missouri.


William Greene Boatright Signature Notes for WILLIAM GREENE BOATRIGHT:


FROM "A Brief sketch of WILLIAM GREENE BOATRIGHT and NANCY FRANCES BOATRIGHT and their Decendents"
by LESLIE GREENE BOATRIGHT

William Greene Boatright Marker William Greene Boatright was the son of Jacob and Judith Boatright, and was born in Boone County, Missouri in January 24, 1830. Jacob and Judith, shortly afterwards, moved to Howard County, then into Saline County, arriving in 1842. They located on a bottom farm north of Arrow Rock and continued to live in this vicinity until the high waters of 1844 forced them to seek higher ground. They next located on a farm about six miles northwest of Marshall, in section 15, township 51, range 21, now known as the "Spicer Farm". There Jacob and Judith reared their family of eight children. Jacob and Judith died of pneumonia at this home place. They are buried in the Mt. Carmel Cemetery, north of Marshall.


William Greene Boatright purchased 40 acres from the original (Jacob and Judieth Boatright) homestead on May 15, 1852. See link for copy of Land Office Record.

William Greene Boatright purchased 40 acres on June 27, 1852 from his sister Margaret and her husband, James M. Smith. The document is dated "1842" but that is in error, as Margaret and James Smith did not wed until 1849 and William would have been 12 years old in 1842. See link for copy of 1852 Land Purchase Record.

William Greene Boatright purchased 160 acres in Lafayette County, Missouri (west of Saline County) on May 1, 1857. See link for copy of Land Office and Purchase Records.

William Greene Boatright sold 40 acres in Saline County, Missouri April 25, 1858. See link for copy of Land Sale in 1858.

William Greene Boatright purchased 200 acres from William Liles and his wife on May 17, 1861. See link for copy of Land Purchase in 1861.

William Greene Boatright sold 20 acres in Saline County, Missouri in 1868. See link for copy of Land Sale in 1868.

William Greene Boatright sold 42 acres in Saline County, Missouri in 1912. See link for copy of Land Sale in 1912.

Original William Greene Boatright Farm William Greene Boatright purchased a farm northwest of Herndon in section 23, township 49, range 22, now known as the "Schrader Farm". Shortly after taking possession of this farm, William went to an old-fashioned revival meeting, which in those days was held in a shady grove, and while at this meeting Nancy Buie rode up on her horse. William made the remark to someone by who he was standing that "there was a gal he was sure going to get acquainted with before he went home". After the services were over William had his horse and had untied Nancy's horse and was waiting to assist her to mount. It could have been because William always wore a smile or it might have been because of Nancy's red hair, but this proved to be love at first sight and they were married on October 22, 1857, at the home of Mrs. Nancy Buie and the Rev. James Martin.

Nancy Frances Buie, the youngest daughter of Daniel and Nancy Buie, was born January 16, 1839, on a farm about seven miles south of Marshall. Daniel Buie, her father, was said to be the first Presbyterian preacher west of the Mississippi River. He lost his health in preaching and died in a sanitarium in Fulton, Missouri. Nancy mother was born September 21, 1803 and died August 20, 1871, and was buried in the Mount Olive Cemetery near her old home place. William and Nancy went immediately to housekeeping on the farm William had purchased northwest of Herndon. They continued on this farm until the outbreak of the Civil War.

William realized that he would soon have to go to the army and being in debt on this farm, deemed it wise and best to sell and buy a smaller farm for which he could pay. He disposed of the original farm and purchased 160 acres just east of his first farm. Shortly after moving to this second farm William joined the Confederate Army under General Price's command.

William Greene Boatright Farm purchased during the Civil War

William Greene Boatright Farm purchased during the Civil War

Click on link for more photos of the William Greene Boatright Farm

When William left home he said he was riding a good grey horse but he decided that this horse could be seen too easily and he traded him off for a horse of a different color. William was in the army about one year but was in no real battles but suffered many hardships. On one occasion he told of being so hungry that he tried to kill the captain's dog to eat. On another occasion, he told of the army moving camp, he was riding behind a wagon with a sick man lying down. He followed this wagon for about a half day and finally someone told him the man had smallpox. William was mustered out of the service after a year of duty.

When William left for the army he was 31 years old and Nancy was 22. He left Nancy at home with two babies and a negro woman whose name was Moth. Moth had a little boy eleven years old named Jack. A few months after he left for the army a third child was born to Nancy. The hardships that Nancy had to endure were something awful. She had to superintend the work of plowing and planting the ground and the making of fences which, in those days, were made of rails. Nancy often said that she got along very well during the day time when she was at work, but after supper she got to thinking of William and could not keep from crying. Moth, the negro woman, was a smoker and she persuaded my mother to try it. Moth told Nancy it would help her to forget her troubles. Nancy formed the habit of smoking and never did quit it. Nancy smoked a little clay pipe and always smoked after each meal.

William returned from the army and they lived the remainder of their lives on this same farm, which was 57 years of married life. Nancy died of pneumonia on December 29, 1914, she was 75 years old. William died of pneumonia on January 27, 1921, 3 days after his 91st birthday.


See link for copy of death certificate.


See link for copy of William Greene Boatright Will.


See link for copy of William Greene Boatright Estate Papers.


They were buried in Ridge Park Cemetery in Marshall, Saline County, Missouri.


From History of Saline County 1881:

William G. Boatright was born in Boone County, Missouri, in 1830, and at an early age moved with his parents to Cooper County, then to Howard County, and finally to Saline County, in 1840, and settled near Arrow Rock. In 1844 the stress of river waters drove him out of the bottom and onto the prairie. He next moved to the vicinity of Miami, where he lived until 1857, when he moved to the place on which he now lives. In 1857 he was married to Miss Fannie Buie, daughter of Daniel Buie, a C. P. Preacher, said to have been the first in the state. He has ten children, all living: John W., Lewis, Finis H., George F., Mary F., Charles R., Annie, Inez, Callie and Leslie. Mr. Boatright is a member of the M. E. Church, South, with membership at Hazel Grove Church. During the war he entered the Confederate service, in Marmaduke's escort, and then in the 10th Missouri cavalry. He started in life with nothing, but by his industry and management has now a fine farm of 200 acres, well stocked and improved. Served in CSA, Private, 10th Regiment, Missouri Cavalry.

10th Cavalry Regiment was organized in December, 1863, using M.L. Young's 11th Missouri Cavalry Battalion as its nucleus. It contained 559 officers and men. The unit served in C. Greene's and J.B. Clarke's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and skirmished in Arkansas and saw action in Price's Missouri Expedition. During this operation it reported 16 killed, 56 wounded, and 73 missing. The regiment was included in the surrender in June, 1865. Its commanders were Colonel Robert R. Lawther, Lieutenant Colonel Merritt L. Young, and Major George W.C. Bennett.


Article in the Marshall, Weekly Democrat-News, Thursday, February 3, 1921:

Funeral from Home

Six Grandsons of Mr. Boatright Served as Pall Bearers

Boatright Stone Ridge Park cemetery

The service over the remains of the late W. G. Boatright, was held Saturday morning at the Boatright country home near Herndon at 11:30. There was a large concourse of friends and neighbors present to pay a loving tribute to one during his long and useful life had gained the esteem of all who knew him. Rev. Mr. Brooks of Longwood conducted the service and several sweet old hymns were sung by a neighborhood choir. After the service the remains were brought to Ridge Park Cemetery for interment on the Boatright lot. An interesting thing relative to the funeral was that six of the grandsons of the aged grandfather served as pall bearers. They were: Harry, Thomas, Dean and Frank of the county, and William Boatright and William Maupin of Kansas City.


1850 Census: Name: William Boatright Date: September 28, 1850 Age: 20 Estimated birth year: abt 1830 Birth place: Missouri Gender: Male Home in 1850 (City,County,State): District 90, Saline County, Missouri Page: 25 Roll: M432_419 U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907 Name: William G Boatright Issue Date: 15 May 1852 State of Record: Missouri Acres: 40 Accession Number: MO1630__.285 Metes and Bounds: No Land Office: Clinton Canceled: No US Reservations: No Mineral Reservations: No Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566) Document Number: 32177 Legal Land Description: Section 15; Twp - 51-N; Range - 21-W; Meridian - 5th PM; County - Saline U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907 Name: William G Boatright Issue Date: 1 May 1857 State of Record: Missouri Acres: 160 Comments: ADD CERT #41014 Accession Number: MO1880__.290 Metes and Bounds: No Land Office: Warsaw Canceled: No US Reservations: No Mineral Reservations: No Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566) Document Number: 41013 Legal Land Description: Section - 11; Twp - 48-N; Range - 27-W; Meridian - 5th PM; County - Lafayette 1860 Census: Name: Wm G Boatright Date: June 1860 Age in 1860: 30 Birthplace: Missouri Home in 1860: Salt Pond, Saline County, Missouri Occupation: Farmer Gender: Male Value of real estate: $2,000 Post Office: Marshall Roll: M653_645 Page: 0 Year: 1860 Head of Household: Wm G Boatright U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 Name: William G. Boatright Side: Confederate Regiment State/Origin: Missouri Regiment Name: 10 Missouri Cavalry Regiment Name Expanded: 10th Regiment, Missouri Cavalry Company: A Rank In: Private Rank In Expanded: Private Rank Out: Private Rank Out Expanded: Private Film Number: M380 roll 2 1870 Census: Name: W G Boatright Date: June 22, 1870 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1830 Age in 1870: 40 Birthplace: Missouri Home in 1870: Salt Pond, Saline, Missouri Occupation: Farmer Race: White Gender: Male Value of real estate: $3,200 Post Office: Brownsville Roll: M593_804 Page: 252 Image: 506 Year: 1870 1880 Census: Name: William BOATRIGHT Date: June 1, 1880 Age: 50 Estimated birth year: 1830 Birthplace: Missouri Occupation: Farmer Relationship to head-of-household: Self Home in 1880: Liberty, Saline, Missouri Marital status: Married Race: White Gender: Male Spouse's name: Nancy F. BOATRIGHT Father's birthplace: SC Mother's birthplace: SC Census Place: Liberty, Saline, Missouri; Roll: T9_716; Family History Film: 1254716; Page: 532A; Enumeration District: 68; Image: 0352. 1900 Census: Name: Wm Boatright Date: June 7, 1900 Home in 1900: Liberty, Saline, Missouri Age: 70 Estimated birth year: 1830 Birthplace: Missouri Race: White Relationship to head-of-house: Head Occupation: Farmer Census Place: Liberty, Saline, Missouri; Roll: T623 902; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 129. 1910 Census: Name: William G Boatright Date: May 5, 1910 Age in 1910: 80 Estimated birth year: abt 1830 Birthplace: Missouri Home in 1910: Liberty Twp, Saline, Missouri Occupation: Farmer Race: White Gender: Male Series: T624 Roll: 823 Part: 2 Page: 167B 1920 Census: Name: William G Boatright Date: January 3, 1920 Age: 89 years Estimated birth year: abt 1831 Birthplace: Missouri Race: White Home in 1920: Liberty, Saline, Missouri Able to read & write: Yes Roll: T625_962 Page: 2 A ED: 196 Image: 325
Burial: 29 Jan 1921 - Ridge Park Cemetery of Marshall, Saline County, Missouri


Nancy Frances Buie Boatright Signature Notes for NANCY FRANCES "FANNIE" BUIE:


Memories of Leslie Green Boatright (son of William and Nancy Boatright):

Nancy Frances Buie Boatright Marker "I often think of the work it required to produce some of the food which was essential in feeding our family (11 children). To have a barrel of sorghum each fall meant that we had to grow some cane. This meant hoeing, thinning, plowing, stripping the blades from the stalks and finally cutting the cane stalks and hauling them to a mill where the juice was pressed from the stalks and then cooked into sorghum molasses. And in addition to all this work, the man who cooked the sorghum retained one-half of what he made for his work.

Gathering the apples in the fall of the year was another hard task. The apples were first picked from the trees and placed in piles in the orchard, later to be sorted. The number one's were stored for winter use. This was done by digging a hole in the ground and covering the apples with straw and dirt. The apples kept in this manner until late spring. The number two's were pealed for apple butter. The apples were cooked in a large kettle in the yard. These apples were seasoned with sweet cider and sorghum molasses. Someone had to stir the apples all the time they were cooking to keep them from sticking to the kettle. Nancy used to drop three or four silver dollars in the kettle of apples. She thought they kept the apple butter from sticking to the bottom of the kettle. The cull apples were ground into cider by crushing them in the mill, which we turned by hand. Later the juice was squeezed from the pulp, and I have never been able to tell which I enjoyed the most, drinking the sweet cider and eating molasses cookies or eating sorghum molasses and butter on a hot biscuit.

Butchering the meat hogs each fall meant more hard work. This work was usually done the week before Christmas, provided the weather and the moon were right. We used to think if we could butcher a hog for each member of the family, we would have meat enough to last us. It usually took about six days to butcher the hogs, cook the grease and grind the sausage. The sausage was ground in a small mill turned by hand, which had two rows of knives on each side that cut the meat in small pieces, and it sure did make good red gravy.

I think I enjoyed seeing the steam engine come in pulling the separator to thresh our wheat more than anything else. It usually took about twenty five men to operate the threshing machine, and they were usually there from two to three days. Nancy had to give all these men their meals, but most of them went to their own homes after supper. I think cooking for this threshing crew was the hardest ordeal that she had to contend.

Nancy knew nothing of modern conveniences. The water for the family washing was drawn from the well with a rope and bucket and carried into the kitchen in tubs and buckets. Nancy had a large flock of tame geese from which she plucked the feathers at regular intervals and made each child a feather bed. The butter was produced from cream that was kept in a tall stone jar and stirred with a wooden paddle until the cream had turned to butter. One hundred pounds of flour would last about ten days and this was made into biscuits and eaten by the hungry children. As a seamstress, Nancy made dresses, aprons, petticoats, sunbonnets with the brim reinforced with pasteboard strips, shirts, trousers, coats, underwear, and sometimes the children's caps, pieced quilts, tacked comforts, knitted gloves, socks and stockings and made the soap for the family's use. Nancy stored all the vegetables and fruit she could obtain. One summer she canned fifty gallons of peaches. Nancy made a manufacturing industry of this farm to be consumed by her family."


Article in the Marshall, Weekly Democrat-News, Thursday, December 31, 1914:

Mrs. Nancy Frances Boatright

Wife of Wm. G. Boatright, Died at home near Herndon, at 1:30am, Tuesday, December 29, 1914.

Mrs. Wm. G. Boatright, 75 years, 11 months and 13 days old, died at her home near Herndon, Tuesday morning, December 29, 1914, after an illness of about two weeks of pneumonia. Mrs. Boatright who was Miss Frances Buie, was the daughter of the late Daniel Buie, a pioneer Cumberland Presbyterian minister. She was married to the surviving husband in 1857, who is 80 years old and was a member of Marmaduke's escort, 10th Missouri Cavalry, during the Civil War.

The Boatright family has been identified with Saline county interests for the past 57 years. Mr. and Mrs. Boatright have lived in their farm in the Herndon neighborhood since their marriage, and ten children were born to the union of which the following survive: Miss Mary Boatright, who lives at home; L. G. Boatright of Herndon; Finis H. Boatright of Marshall; G. F. Boatright, Sedalia; C. R. Boatright, San Francisco, Mrs. O. T. Diehl, Trenton, North Dakota; Mrs. J. B. Finley, of near Houstonia; Mrs. S. J. Maupin, Kansas City.

Mr. Thomas Boatright of Marshall is a brother-in-law of the deceased.

Mrs. Boatright who was a member of the Hazel Grove church at Herndon, was a woman of the highest ideals. Her father is said to have been the first Cumberland minister in the state. The funeral took place at the home, two miles northwest of Herndon, Wednesday at 10 a.m., and Rev. G. L. Coffman of Sweet Springs had charge of the services. Burial was in Ridge Park cemetery.

P. M. Walker has charge of funeral arrangements.


Article in the Marshall, Weekly Democrat-News, Thursday, March 4, 1915

In Memory of the Late Mrs. W. G. Boatright

Mrs. Nancy Frances, wife of W. G. Boatright who died of pneumonia on December 29, 1914, at 1:30 a.m., at her home near Herndon, where she has lived over fifty years, was born January 16, 1839, near Mt. Olive church, was married October 22, 1857. A brief funeral service was held at residence, burial at Ridge Park.

The deceased leaves to mourn her loss an aged and devoted husband and 9 children: John W. of Herndon neighborhood, Finis H. of Marshall, Geo. F. of Pettis county, Chas. R. of California, Miss Mary of the home, Mrs. O. T. Diehl, North Dakota, Mrs. S. J. Maupin, Kansas City; Leslie G. of Herndon neighborhood; two are dead, Louis, who died in 1912, and the baby, Jesse Lee, who died in 1884.

She was the youngest daughter of Rev. D. D. Buie, who was said to be the first Cumberland Presbyterian preacher in the state.

Our hearts were made sad by the calling of this good woman home.

At an early age she gave her heart to God at a Baptist camp-meeting, uniting with this church, but after her marriage she went with her husband to the Methodist church, they being charter members of the M. E. church at Herndon. Her long years of loyalty, devotion, and activity in His service have proved the sincerity of her profession. She loved her church, was a consistant and faithful member, a regular attendant until age crept on. Truly it can be said her home was a home for the minister, many will recall the hearty welcome she gave them. Her life was full of good deeds, always ready to minister to the sick and afflicted. Not only will she be greatly missed in the home, but by all who knew her. None knew her but to love her.

She had been a great sufferer for years but bore it with Christian fortitude. When God called she was ready and anxious to go. In her last sickness she was unable to speak, but two years ago, when seemingly her life was suspended by a thread, she made all arrangements to go; assured her family she had no fears of death; often spoke of how sweet it would be to go home to Heaven. Her only regret was leaving her husband, who she had so tenderly cared for the past 57 years.

If her loved ones could draw back the certain, they would not ask mother to return to this sinful world. Her departure to be with Christ has left a vacancy only to be compensated by the indwelling presence of the spirit and comforting grace of Christ, who doeth all things well. By her kind gentle manner and devotion to her family, she made home bright and attractive and her wise counsel and strong Christian character were such a help and inspiration in the home, that lovingly they all clung to her to the end.

"No longer we'll wander in darkness and night,
We will walk in that city where God is the light;
My loved ones will wait at the harbor for me
To welcome me home where from sin I'll be free.
No sickness, no sorrow, no pains as before;
With joy we'ss commune with our friends as of yore,
A rapture unspeakable then shall be mine,
As there I behold him so pure and divine.
A halo of glory will shadow us o'er
With joy we will sing on that far away shore.
There happy we'll be for the Lord we shall see,
When the beautiful gates unfold."
(dwit)


See link for copy of death certificate.


1860 Census:
Name: Nancy Boatright
Date: June 1860
Age in 1860: 21
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1860: Salt Pond, Saline County, Missouri
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M653_645
Page: 0
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Wm G Boatright

1870 Census:
Name: Nancy F Boatright
Date: June 22, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1839
Age in 1870: 31
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1870: Salt Pond, Saline, Missouri
Race: White
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Brownsville
Roll: M593_804
Page: 252
Image: 506
Year: 1870

1880 Census:
Name: Nancy F. BOATRIGHT
Date: June 1, 1880
Age: 41
Estimated birth year: <1839>
Birthplace: Missouri
Relationship to head-of-household: Wife
Home in 1880: Liberty, Saline, Missouri
Marital status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Female
Spouse's name: William BOATRIGHT
Father's birthplace: KY
Mother's birthplace: KY
Census Place: Liberty, Saline, Missouri; 
Roll: T9_716; Family History Film: 1254716; Page: 532A; 
Enumeration District: 68; Image: 0352.

1900 Census:
Name: Nancy F Boatright
Date: June 7, 1900
Home in 1900: Liberty, Saline, Missouri
Age: 61
Estimated birth year: 1839
Birthplace: Missouri
Race: White
Relationship to head-of-house: Wife
Census Place: Liberty, Saline, Missouri; 
Roll: T623 902; Page: 4A; 
Enumeration District: 129.

1910 Census:
Name: Nancy F Boatright
Date: May 5, 1910
Age in 1910: 71
Estimated birth year: abt 1839
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1910: Liberty Twp, Saline, Missouri
Race: White
Gender: Female
Series: T624
Roll: 823
Part: 2
Page: 167B
Burial: 30 Dec 1914 - Ridge Park Cemetery of Marshall, Saline County, Missouri


Children of WILLIAM BOATRIGHT and NANCY BUIE are:

9-281.    i. JOHN WILLIAM BOATRIGHT, b. 03 Aug 1859, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                      d. 22 Oct 1938, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri.
9-282.   ii. LOUIS BOATRIGHT, b. 03 Oct 1861, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                               d. 12 Aug 1912, Marshall, Saline County, Missouri.
9-283.  iii. FINIS HARVEY BOATRIGHT, b. 23 Mar 1864, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                      d. 19 Feb 1926, Marshall, Saline County, Missouri.
9-284.   iv. GEORGE FRANCIS BOATRIGHT, b. 03 Sep 1866, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                        d. 10 Mar 1936, Kansas City Jackson County, Missouri.
9-285.    v. CHARLES ROBERTSON BOATRIGHT, b. 07 Nov 1869, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                           d. 12 Sep 1936, San Francisco, San Francisco County, California.
9-286.   vi. MARY FRANCES BOATRIGHT, b. 11 Aug 1871, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                      d. 27 Oct 1931, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri.
9-287.  vii. ANNIE BOATRIGHT, b. 25 Dec 1872, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                               d. Trenton, Williams County, North Dakota.
9-288. viii. INEZ BOATRIGHT, b. 25 Nov 1874, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri;
                              d. 15 May 1966, Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri
9-289.   ix. SALLIE BOATRIGHT, b. 07 Dec 1876, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri;
                                d. 02 Nov 1960, Saline County, Missouri. 
9-290.    x. LESLIE GREENE BOATRIGHT, b. 15 Feb 1880, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                       d. 05 Dec 1950, Marshall, Saline County, Missouri.
9-291.   xi. JESSE LEE BOATRIGHT, b. 27 Jan 1882, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                   d. 12 Jan 1884, Herndon, Saline County, Missouri.

8-137. ELIZA A. BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1835 in Howard County, Missouri. She married JOHN B. CHAMBERLAIN 19 Sep 1869 in Saline County, Missouri. He was born 1829 in Canada.


Notes for ELIZA A. BOATRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Eliza Boatright
Date: September 28, 1850
Age: 18
Estimated birth year: abt 1832
Birth place: Missouri
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 90, Saline County, Missouri
Page: 25
Roll: M432_419

1860 Census:
Name: Eliza A Boatright
Date: August 1860
Age in 1860: 24
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1860: Miami, Saline County, Missouri
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M653_645
Page: 0
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Jacob Boatright


Children of ELIZA BOATRIGHT and JOHN CHAMBERLAIN are:

        i. JOHN J. CHAMBERLAIN, b. 1871.

       ii. THOMAS F. CHAMBERLAIN, b. 1875.

8-138. THOMAS HART BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1836 in Howard County, Missouri, and died 21 Apr 1916 in Marshall, Saline County, Missouri. He married MARY ELIZABETH HARL, 1885 in Independence, Jackson County, Missouri, daughter of JOHN HARL and MARY MANNING. She was born 04 Nov 1840 in Kentucky, and died 03 Dec 1913 in Marshall, Saline County, Missouri.


Notes for THOMAS HART BOATRIGHT:

Thomas Hart Boatright Marker


See link for copy of Land Purchase.


See link for copy of Land Sale.


from The History of Saline County 1881:

Thomas Boatright was born in Howard County, Missouri, and was raised in Saline County, having moved there with his parents when quite young, and was educated at private schools. In 1861, he joined Captain Ed Brown's company, M. S. G., as private, and served six months. Was at the first battle of Boonesville, Wilson's Creek, and Lexington. In 1864 he enlisted again, this time in Captain Page's company, in Marmaduke's escort, as second lieutenant, and was in the battles of Blues, Lexington, Westport, and the many others that occurred during Price's retreat. He served on to the end of the war, and surrendered in Shreveport, in 1865.

Returned to Saline, and farmed until 1871, then located in Marshall, and engaged in the insurance and real estate business. In 1878 he was elected city collector, and in 1880 reelected. Is also a notary public, and the firm is doing an extensive and growing real estate business.


Thomas and Mary Elizabeth did not have children.


See link for copy of death certificate.


See link for copy of Thomas Hart Boatright Will.


See link for copy of Map of Thomas Boatright Addition in Marshall, Missouri.


Saline County Weekly Progress, Friday, April 21, 1916

Thos. H. Boatright Dead

Word has just been received at this office as we go to press that Thomas H. Boatright, an old and honored citizen of this community, died at his home on North Jefferson Street at 1 o'clock a.m., Friday, April 21st., after an illness extending over several weeks, but from which he was thought to be recovering nicely. The news of his death will come as a great shock to his many friends in the community.

Funeral arrangements have not been made at this time.

A fuller obituary will be given in The Progress next week.


Saline County Weekly Progress, Friday, April 28, 1916

Thomas Hart Boatright, whose unexpected death, we mentioned briefly last week, was 79 years of age when death came to him unexpectedly at his home on North Jefferson at 12:15 a.m. Friday, April 21st. Mr. Boatright's death was a great shock to his many friends and acquaintances, as his condition for several days past had been much better and at no time during his recent illness had he been thought to be in an immediately dangerous condition. Last fall he fell and sustained a fracture of the hip, but this was more inconvenient and trying than dangerous. On Thursday he was in his usual spirits, and sat and talked to Mr. and Mrs. Carter, who occupy his home, until his usual bed time and seemed in the best of spirits. About midnight Mrs. Carter heard the electric summons bell, which connected from his sleeping room to that of Mr. and Mrs. Carter, and went at once to his room where she found him suffering from severe pains in the region of the heart. The doctor, Dr. John M. Berry, was summoned at once, but Mr. Boatright died before Dr. Berry could administer to him. Death was due to heart trouble.

Mr. Boatright is survived by two brothers, William Boatright of Herndon and John Boatright of Schell City. His wife died a few years ago, leaving two daughters, step-daughters to Mr. Boatright, to whom he was deeply attached. One of those, Mrs. Overton B. Gentry of Independence, was here just a week before Mr. Boatright's death. Upon his death she was summoned at once and came and took charge of the funeral arrangements. Another, Mrs. Collins Peebles of Washington, D. C., telegraphed that she would not be able to be present at the funeral.

Mr. Boatright was born in Howard County in 1837, but moved to Saline while yet young. During the Civil War he served in the Confederate Army and was a Second Lieutenant in the escort of General M. M. Marmaduke. He took part in most of the battles in Missouri, including those at Marshall, Boonville, Lexington, Wilson's Creek, Westport and others. At the close of the war, Mr. Boatright returned to Saline and made his home at Marshall in 1871, having lived on his farm from the close of the war till that time. During his first residence in Marshall he was engaged in the real estate and insurance business but later on installed the first gas plant in the city and was the owner and operator of it for a number of years, retiring several years ago from active business.

In 1885 he married Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Harl-Robertson at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Gentry, in Independence. She died about two years ago and since then he has lived at their home on North Jefferson, someone always occupying the house with him.

In Mr. Boatright the community loses a man who figured prominently in its history for many years. He had many friends, for he merited friendship. Throughout the community he was respected and his unexpected death was a severe blow to many.

The funeral was conducted at the Christian Church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 by Elder Harvey Baker Smith. Mr. Boatright was a member of the Methodist church, but had never taken membership in Marshall. His was a regular attendent of the Christian church, however, and it was a church home to both of them for a number of years. The Christian church choir sang, "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere," "Abide With Me" and "In the Sweet Bye and Bye." The funeral was under the auspices of the Masonic fraternity and was escorted to the cemetery by the Knights of Missouri Commandery in full uniform and a great many members of Trilumina Lodge, No. 205, A.F. & A.M. The grave was beautifully decorated with the tributes, there being one from each of the Masonic fraternities. Dr. M.T. Chastain, D. D. Duggins, Judge R.W. Hickman, J. W. Keys and George Purcell were pall bearers.

1850 Census:
Name: Richmond T Boatright
Date: September 28, 1850
Age: 11
Estimated birth year: abt 1839
Birth place: Missouri
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 90, Saline County, Missouri
Page: 25
Roll: M432_419

1860 Census:
Name: Thos Boatright
Date: September 1860
Age in 1860: 20
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1860: Marshall, Saline County, Missouri
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M653_645
Page: 0
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Thos Boatright

1870 Census:
Name: Thomas Boatright
Date: August 8, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1836
Age in 1870: 34
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1870: Miami, Saline, Missouri
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $2,000
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M593_804
Page: 209
Image: 421
Year: 1870

1910 Census:
Name: Thomas Boatwright
Date: April 15, 1910
Age in 1910: 70
Estimated birth year: abt 1840
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1910: 2-Wd Marshall, Saline, Missouri
Occupation: Own Income
Race: White
Gender: Male
Series: T624
Roll: 823
Part: 2
Page: 246A
Burial: 25 Apr 1916 - Ridge Park Cemetery of Marshall, Saline County, Missouri


Notes for MARY ELIZABETH HARL:

Mary Elizabeth Harl Boatright Marker


See link for copy of death certificate.

Weekly Democrat-News, Marshall, Thursday, December 11, 1913

Laid in Ridge Park Cemetery - Large Number Attend Funeral of Mrs. Boatright, Despite the Rain The funeral of Mrs. Thomas Boatright held at the Christian church Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock was an impressive sweet service.

Eld. B. T. Wharton, who conducted the exercises took the first part of the 14th chapter of John for the basis of his talk. This scripture lesson was one that Mrs. Boatright loved to dwell upon, especially during her long illness. Mr. Wharton paid a loving tribute to one whose life had been so inseperably connected with the church of which he has been pastor for the past fifteen or sixteen years; she had been reared from childhood in the denomination, her grandfather Harl, who came to Saline in an early day from Kentucky having been a charter member of Alexander Campbell's church and a leader in the reformation, so the granddaughter had been singerlarly devoted to the Christian church.

The hyms sung by the church choir were: "Nearer My God to Thee," "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere," and "Abide With Me." These hymns were also favorites of the deceased and the entire service was a consolation and comfort to the bereaved ones.

A large number of floral offerings bore silent testimony of love friendship and esteem. At the close of the service at the church the remains were taken to Ridge Park and laid on the Boatright lot, neath a canopy of exquisite blossoms, in their purity and beauty typical of the life just ended. One of the designs was from the Woman's Aid Society of the Christian church.

The pall bearers were: Ed. H. Mitchell, Henry Sherk, J. M. Rose, J. E. McAmis, Ben Striker and H. C. Francisco.


1910 Census:
Name: Mary E Boatwright
Date: April 15, 1910
Age in 1910: 67
Estimated birth year: abt 1843
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1910: 2-Wd Marshall, Saline, Missouri
Race: White
Gender: Female
Series: T624
Roll: 823
Part: 2
Page: 246A
Burial: Ridge Park Cemetery of Marshall, Saline County, Missouri


8-139. JAMES HARVEY BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1838 in Howard County, Missouri, and died 12 Aug 1910 in Austin, Travis County, Texas.


Notes for JAMES HARVEY BOATRIGHT:

See link for copy of death certificate.

Served in CSA, 4th Regiment, Missouri Cavalry.

4th Cavalry Regiment was assembled during December, 1861, and included Preston's Missouri Cavalry Battalion. Some of the men were from St. Louis and Barton County, and many had served in the Missouri State Guard. The unit served in the Trans-Mississippi Department and was attached to C. Green's, Shelby's, and J.B. Clarks' Brigade. It participated in Marmaduke's Expedition into Missouri, fought in various conflicts in Arkansas, and shared in Price's Missouri operations. The regiment reported 11 casualties with Marmaduke, 6 at Poison Spring, 13 at Jenkins' Ferry, and 63 in Price's Expedition. The 4th was included in the surrender in June, 1865. Colonel John Q. Burbridge, Lieutenant Colonel William J. Preston, and Major Dennis Smith were its commanders.

1850 Census:
Name: James H Boatright
Date: September 28, 1850
Age: 12
Estimated birth year: abt 1838
Birth place: Missouri
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 90, Saline County, Missouri
Page: 25
Roll: M432_419

1860 Census:
Name: Harvey Boatright
Date: September 1860
Age in 1860: 22
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1860: Marshall, Saline County, Missouri
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M653_645
Page: 0
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Thos Boatright

U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865 
Name: James H Boatwright
Residence: Miami, Saline, Missouri 
Class: 1 
Congressional District: 6th 
Age on 1 July 1863: 25 
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1838 
Race: White 
Marital Status: Unmarried (Single) 
Place of Birth: Missouri 

1870 Census:
Name: Harvey Boatright
Date: August 8, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1838
Age in 1870: 32
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1870: Miami, Saline, Missouri
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M593_804
Page: 209
Image: 421
Year: 1870

1910 Census:
Name: J H Boatright
Date: April 18, 1910
Age in 1910: 72 
Estimated birth year: abt 1838 
Birthplace: Missouri 
Relation to Head of House: Inmate 
Father's Birth Place: South Carolina 
Mother's Birth Place: South Carolina 
Home in 1910: Austin Ward 2, Travis, Texas 
Marital Status: Single 
Race: White 
Gender: Male 
Census Place: Austin Ward 2, Travis, Texas; 
Roll T624_1595; Page: 3A; 
Enumeration District: 66; Image: 7.
Living at Confederate Home for Veterans

Texas Deaths Certificate# 1966
Name: J.H. Boatwright  
Death Date: 12 Aug 1910  
Death Place: Austin, Texas  
Gender: Male  
Race: White  
Death Age: 71 years  
Estimated Birth Date: 1839  
There was no personal information on this certificate.
He had been an inmate at the Confederate Home for six years.
Burial: Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Travis County, Texas


8-140. HENRY H. BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1840 in Howard County, Missouri, and died in Stover, Morgan County, Missouri. He married (1) MARTHA JANE JONES 14 Jun 1867 in Saline County, Missouri. She was born 1849 in Virginia, and died 1880. He married (2) EMILY GRACE 26 Mar 1882 in Morgan County, Missouri. She was born 1851.


Notes for HENRY H. BOATRIGHT:

Served in CSA, 4th Regiment, Missouri Cavalry.

4th Cavalry Regiment was assembled during December, 1861, and included Preston's Missouri Cavalry Battalion. Some of the men were from St. Louis and Barton County, and many had served in the Missouri State Guard. The unit served in the Trans-Mississippi Department and was attached to C. Green's, Shelby's, and J.B. Clarks' Brigade. It participated in Marmaduke's Expedition into Missouri, fought in various conflicts in Arkansas, and shared in Price's Missouri operations. The regiment reported 11 casualties with Marmaduke, 6 at Poison Spring, 13 at Jenkins' Ferry, and 63 in Price's Expedition. The 4th was included in the surrender in June, 1865. Colonel John Q. Burbridge, Lieutenant Colonel William J. Preston, and Major Dennis Smith were its commanders.


Henry H. Boatright Deed of Trust in Saline County, Missouri in 1875. See link for copy of Deed of Trust in 1875.


See link for copy of Land Sales.


1850 Census:
Name: Henry Boatright
Date: September 28, 1850
Age: 10
Estimated birth year: abt 1840
Birth place: Missouri
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 90, Saline County, Missouri
Page: 25
Roll: M432_419

1860 Census:
Name: Henry Boatright
Date: September 1860
Age in 1860: 20
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1860: Marshall, Saline County, Missouri
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M653_645
Page: 0
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Thos Boatright

1870 Census:
Name: Henry Boatwright
Date: August 13, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1840
Age in 1870: 30
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1870: Marshall, Saline, Missouri
Race: White
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $200
Post Office: Brownsville
Roll: M593_804
Page: 166
Image: 333
Year: 1870

Notes for MARTHA JANE JONES:
1870 Census:
Name: Martha Jane Boatwright
Date: August 13, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1852
Age in 1870: 18
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1870: Marshall, Saline, Missouri
Race: White
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Brownsville
Roll: M593_804
Page: 166
Image: 333
Year: 1870


Children of HENRY BOATRIGHT and MARTHA JONES are:

9-292.    i. JAMES HENRY BOATRIGHT, b. 19 Mar 1869, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                     d. 07 Apr 1957, Versailles, Morgan County, 
                                     Missouri.
9-292A.  ii. JOHN WILLIAM BOATRIGHT, b. 26 Oct 1873, Saline County, Missouri. 
                                      d. 21 Mar 1951, Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.
9-292B. iii. IDA J. BOATRIGHT, b. 1874, Saline County, Missouri. 

9-292C.  iv. THOMAS L. BOATRIGHT, b. 22 Dec 1875, Saline County, Missouri; 
                                   d. 14 Sep 1958, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, 
                                   Kansas.

8-141. JOHN G. BOATRIGHT (JACOB8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 27 Sep 1842 in Cooper County, Missouri, and died 15 Aug 1929 in Nevada, Vernon County, Missouri. He married IDA WHIPS 29 Dec 1872 in Marshall, Saline County, Missouri, daughter of JOHN WHIPPS and ELIZABETH RUDY. She was born 19 Nov 1851 in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, and died 16 May 1945 in Nevada, Vernon County, Missouri.


Notes for JOHN G. BOATRIGHT:

John G. and Ida Whips Boatright Gravestone

See link for copy of death certificate.

1850 Census:
Name: John Boatright
Date: September 28, 1850
Age: 8
Estimated birth year: abt 1842
Birth place: Missouri
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 90, 
Saline County, Missouri
Page: 25
Roll: M432_419

1860 Census:
Name: John G Boatright
Date: August 1860
Age in 1860: 17
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1860: Miami, Saline County, Missouri
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M653_645
Page: 0
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Jacob Boatright

1870 Census:
Name: John Boatright
Date: August 8, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1843
Age in 1870: 27
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1870: Miami, Saline, Missouri
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Marshall
Roll: M593_804
Page: 209
Image: 421
Year: 1870

1880 Census:
Name: John BOATRIGHT
Date: June 22, 1880
Age: 34
Estimated birth year: <1846>
Birthplace: Missouri
Occupation: Druggist
Relationship to head-of-household: Self
Home in 1880: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri
Marital status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Male
Spouse's name: Ida BOATRIGHT
Father's birthplace: KY
Mother's birthplace: VA
Census Place: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri; 
Roll: T9_739; Family History Film: 1254739; Page: 468D; 
Enumeration District: 213; Image: 0439.

1900 Census:
Name: John Boatright
Date: June 4, 1900
Home in 1900: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri
Age: 57
Estimated birth year: 1843
Birthplace: Missouri
Race: White
Relationship to head-of-house: Head
Occupation: Grain Dealer
Census Place: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri; 
Roll: T623 906; Page: 4A; 
Enumeration District: 116.

1910 Census:
Name: John Boatright
Date: April 18, 1910
Age in 1910: 68
Estimated birth year: abt 1842
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1910: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri
Occupation: Grain Dealer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Mother's Birth Place: Not Stated
Father's Birth Place: Not Stated
Census Place: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri;
Roll: T624_827; Page: 4A; 
Enumeration District: 135; Image: 218.

1920 Census:
Name: John Boatright
Date: January 6, 1920
Age: 77 years
Estimated birth year: abt 1843
Birthplace: Missouri
Race: White
Home in 1920: Nevada Ward 2, Vernon, Missouri
Home owned: Own
Sex: Male
Marital status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Mother's Birth Place: Tennessee
Father's Birth Place: Tennessee
Census Place: Nevada Ward 2, Vernon, Missouri;
Roll: T625_965; Page: 6A; 
Enumeration District: 162; Image: 755.
Burial: 17 Aug 1929 - Green Lawn Cemetery, Nevada, Vernon County, Missouri


Notes for IDA WHIPS:

See link for copy of death certificate.

1880 Census:
Name: Ida BOATRIGHT
Date: June 22, 1880
Age: 28
Estimated birth year: <1852>
Birthplace: Kentucky
Relationship to head-of-household: Wife
Home in 1880: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri
Marital status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Female
Spouse's name: John BOATRIGHT
Father's birthplace: KY
Mother's birthplace: KY
Census Place: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri; 
Roll: T9_739; Family History Film: 1254739; Page: 468D; 
Enumeration District: 213; Image: 0439.

1900 Census:
Name: Ida W Boatright
Date: June 4, 1900
Home in 1900: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri
Age: 48
Estimated birth year: 1852
Birthplace: Kentucky
Race: White
Relationship to head-of-house: Wife
Census Place: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri; 
Roll: T623 906; Page: 4A; 
Enumeration District: 116.

1910 Census:
Name: Ida W Boatright
Date: April 18, 1910
Age in 1910: 58
Estimated birth year: abt 1852
Birthplace: Kentucky
Home in 1910: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri
Race: White
Gender: Female
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Mother's Birth Place: Kentucky
Father's Birth Place: Kentucky
Census Place: Schell City, Vernon, Missouri;
Roll: T624_827; Page: 4A; 
Enumeration District: 135; Image: 218.

1920 Census:
Name: Ida Boatright
Date: January 6, 1920
Age: 67 years
Estimated birth year: abt 1853
Birthplace: Kentucky
Race: White
Home in 1920: Nevada Ward 2, Vernon, Missouri
Occupation: Keeping boarders
Sex: Female
Marital status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Mother's Birth Place: Kentucky
Father's Birth Place: Kentucky
Census Place: Nevada Ward 2, Vernon, Missouri;
Roll: T625_965; Page: 6A; 
Enumeration District: 162; Image: 755.

1930 Census:
Name: Ida Boatright
Date: April 4, 1930
Age: 77
Estimated birth year: abt 1853
Birthplace: Kentucky
Relation to head-of-house: Head
Race: White
Home in 1930: Nevada, Vernon, Missouri
Occupation: None
Census Place: Nevada, Vernon, Missouri;
Roll: 1250; Page: 4A; 
Enumeration District: 9; Image: 118.0.
Burial: Green Lawn Cemetery, Nevada, Vernon County, Missouri


Children of JOHN BOATRIGHT and IDA WHIPS are:

9-293.    i. ARTHUR JOHN BOATRIGHT, b. 17 Jan 1874, Vernon County, Missouri;
                                     d. 21 Jul 1955, Coffeyville, Montgomery County, 
                                     Kansas.
9-294.   ii. LOUIS AUBREY BOATRIGHT, b. May 1878, Vernon County, Missouri; 
                                      d. 16 Sep 1952, Nevada, Vernon County, Missouri.
9-295.  iii. OLA G. BOATRIGHT, b. Jun 1880, Vernon County, Missouri.

8-142. THOMAS BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1828 in Henderson County, Tennessee, and died 03 Dec 1887 in Iron County, Missouri. He married (1) LUCINDA COKER 1851 in Carroll County, Arkansas, daughter of CHARLES COKER and ELIZABETH FRIEND. She was born 1826 in Lead Hill, Carroll County, Arkansas, and died Abt. 1864 in Dade County, Missouri. He married (2) REBECCA PHILLIPS 24 Oct 1865 in Iron County, Missouri. She was born 1835 in Ohio.


Notes for THOMAS BOATWRIGHT:

In the 1850 Marion County, Arkansas census Lucinda Coker Nepp and her children Henry age 5, Jackson age 4 and Charles age 1 are shown living with Charles Coker and his family.

In the 1860 Marion County, Arkansas census, Jackson and Charles are listed as "Boatwright", apparently adopting Step-father Thomas Boatwright name.

Thomas died in Iron County, Missouri; will was probated 1893 in St. Francois County, Missouri.

James Boatwright Coffin Receipt

James "John" M. Boatwright bought a coffin for his father, Thomas Boatwright. Thomas died Dec. 3, 1887, 61 years old. Also noted in this book, a 2 foot coffin was $2.25 and 4 foot coffin was $3.50. Source: John Albert Undertaking Business, Ironton, Missouri.

1850 Census:
Name: Thomas Boatwright
Date: August 18, 1850
Age: 22
Estimated birth year: abt 1828
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Kaw, Jackson County, Missouri
Page: 249
Roll: M432_402

1860 Census:
Name: Thomas Boatwright
Date: July 30, 1860
Age in 1860: 33
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: Sugarloaf, Marion, Arkansas
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_46
Page: 670
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Thomas Boatwright

1870 Census:
Name: Thomas Boatwright
Date: July 11, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1830
Age in 1870: 40
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1870: Township 33 Range 3 East, Iron, Missouri
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Ironton
Roll: M593_780
Page: 538
Image: 609
Year: 1870

1880 Census: 
Name: Thomas Boatright
Date: June 15, 1880
Age: 52 
Birth Year: abt 1828 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Home in 1880: Bellevue, Washington, Missouri 
Race: White 
Gender: Male 
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head) 
Marital Status: Married 
Spouse's Name: Rebecca Bealright 
Father's Birthplace: Tennessee 
Mother's Birthplace: Tennessee 
Occupation: Farmer 
Census Place: Bellevue, Washington, Missouri; 
Roll: 740; Family History Film: 1254740; Page: 52B; 
Enumeration District: 171; Image: 0310.

Death Record for Thomas Boatright 
Name: Boatright, Thomas 
Age: 61 years 
Cause of Death: Erysipelas 
Source: John Albert Undertaking Business 
Death Date: 3 December 1887 
Place of Death: Iron Co. 
Cemetery: Iron Mountain, Missouri 
Notes: Undertaker/Mortician - John Albert 
Father of James BOATRIGHT. 
Burial: Iron Mountain Cemetery, Iron County, Missouri


Notes for LUCINDA COKER:

In the 1850 Marion County, Arkansas census Lucinda Coker Nepp and her children Henry age 5, Jackson age 4 and Charles age 1 are shown living with Lucinda's parents, Charles and Elizabeth Coker and family.

In the 1860 Marion County, Arkansas census, Jackson and Charles are listed as "Boatwright".

In the 1880 Randolph County, Arkansas census, Charles is listed as "Nipps".

Lucinda Coker Boatwright Travel Permission

1860 Census:
Name: Lucinda Boatwright
Date: July 30, 1860
Age in 1860: 34
Birthplace: Arkansas
Home in 1860: Sugarloaf, Marion, Arkansas
Race: White
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_46
Page: 670
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Thomas Boatwright

Notes for REBECCA PHILLIPS:

Rebecca remarried in 1891: James M. Gann of Washington County, Missouri and Rebecca Boatwright of Iron Mountain, Missouri; married on 09 March 1891 by Franz Dinger, J. P.

1870 Census:
Name: Rebecca Boatwright
Date: July 11, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1835
Age in 1870: 35
Birthplace: Ohio
Home in 1870: Township 33 Range 3 East, Iron, Missouri
Race: White
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Ironton
Roll: M593_780
Page: 538
Image: 609
Year: 1870

1880 Census: 
Name: Rebecca Boatright
Date: June 15, 1880
Age: 39 
Birth Year: abt 1841 
Birthplace: Ohio 
Home in 1880: Bellevue, Washington, Missouri 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Relation to Head of House: Wife 
Marital Status: Married 
Spouse's Name: Thomas Bealright 
Father's Birthplace: Ohio 
Mother's Birthplace: Ohio 
Census Place: Bellevue, Washington, Missouri; 
Roll: 740; Family History Film: 1254740; Page: 52B; 
Enumeration District: 171; Image: 0310.

Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002 
Name: James M Gann 
Marriage Date: 9 Mar 1891 
Marriage Location: Ironton, Iron, Missouri 
Marriage County: Iron 
Spouse Name: Rebecca Boatorght 


Children of THOMAS BOATWRIGHT and LUCINDA COKER are:

9-296.    i. WILLIAM BOATWRIGHT, b. 1852, Arkansas.

9-297.   ii. JOSEPH CALVIN BOATWRIGHT, b. 29 Nov 1854, Marion County, Arkansas; 
                                        d. 09 Nov 1923, Shawnee Memorial Hospital, 
                                        Shawnee, Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma. 
9-298.  iii. JAMES "JOHN" M. BOATWRIGHT, b. Mar 1857, Marion County, Arkansas; 
                                          d. 04 Jul 1907, Mill Spring, Wayne County, 
                                          Missouri.
9-299.   iv. LUTICIA KASSIA BOATWRIGHT, b. 1859, Marion County, Arkansas.


Children of THOMAS BOATWRIGHT and REBECCA PHILLIPS are:

9-300.    v. MARY ELIZABETH BOATWRIGHT, b. 1867, Iron County, Missouri; 
                                         d. Mar 1891, Missouri.
9-301.   vi. JOHN T. BOATRIGHT, b. 05 Jul 1868, Iron County, Missouri; 
                                 d. 17 Mar 1940, Farmington, St. Francois County, 
                                 Missouri.
9-302.  vii. WILLIAM HENRY BOATRIGHT, b. 04 Aug 1870, Iron County, Missouri;
                                       d. 19 Feb 1932, Ironton, Iron County, Missouri.
9-303. viii. NANCY E. BOATWRIGHT, b. Jun 1870, Iron County, Missouri; 
                                   d. Bef. 1880, Iron County, Missouri.
9-303A.  ix. RICHARD BOATWRIGHT, b. Nov 1872, Iron County, Missouri. 

9-304.    x. EDWARD B. BOATWRIGHT, b. 20 Feb 1875, Iron County, Missouri; 
                                    d. 09 May 1943, Madison County, Missouri. 
9-304A.  xi. MISSOURI A. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1877, Iron County, Missouri. 

9-304B. xii. MARTHA C. BOATWRIGHT, b. 1880, Washington County, Missouri. 

8-143. DOCK BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1830 in Henderson County, Tennessee, and died 1863 in Carroll County, Arkansas. He married (1) MAHALA COKER, 1849 in Carroll County, Arkansas. She was born 1830 in Carroll County, Arkansas, and died 1861. He married (2) ELIZABETH GILBERT, 1863 in Batesville, Independence County, Arkansas. She was born Feb 1847 in Owesley County, Kentucky, and died in Ozark, Johnson County, Arkansas.


Notes for ELIZABETH GILBERT:

Burial: Boston Cemetery, Boston Arkansas


8-144. CYNTHIA BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1835 in Henderson County, Tennessee.


Notes for CYNTHIA BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Cyntha Boatwright
Date: August 18, 1850
Age: 15
Estimated birth year: abt 1835
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Kaw, Jackson County, Missouri
Page: 249
Roll: M432_402

8-145. NANCY BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born Jul 1836 in Henderson County, Tennessee. She married DANIEL S. PARKER.


Notes for NANCY BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Nancy Boatwright
Date: August 18, 1850
Age: 14
Estimated birth year: abt 1836
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Kaw, Jackson County, Missouri
Page: 249
Roll: M432_402

8-146. RICHARD BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1840 in Henderson County, Tennessee, and died Bef 1870 in Missouri. He married NANCY SAFINA OWEN, daughter of JESSE OWEN and NANCY JONES. She was born 1846 in Johnson County, Tennessee, and died 23 Oct 1926 in St. Louis County, Missouri.


Notes for RICHARD BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Richard Boatwright
Date: August 18, 1850
Age: 12
Estimated birth year: abt 1838
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Kaw, Jackson County, Missouri
Page: 249
Roll: M432_402

1860 Census:
Name: Richard Boatright
Date: September 24, 1860
Age in 1860: 20
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: Sugar Loaf, Carroll County, Arkansas
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_38
Page: 914
Year: 1860
Head of Household: William Boatright

Notes for NANCY SAFINA OWEN:
1850 Census:
Name: Nancy S Owens 
Date: October 2, 1850
Age: 4 
Estimated birth year: abt 1846 
Birth Place: Tennessee 
Gender: Female 
Home in 1850 (City,County,State): District 6, Johnson, Tennessee 
Family Number: 14 
Census Place: District 6, Johnson, Tennessee; 
Roll  M432_886; Page: 35A; Image: 74.

1860 Census:
Name: Nancy S Owen 
Date: June 18, 1860
Age in 1860: 14 
Birth Year: abt 1846 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Home in 1860: Howell, Howell, Missouri 
Gender: Female 
Post Office: West Plains 
Census Place: Howell, Howell, Missouri; 
Roll M653_624; Page: 560; Image: 20; 
Family History Library Film: 803624.

1870 Census:
Name: Nancy Boatright 
Date: July 1, 1870
Birth Year: abt 1846 
Age in 1870: 24 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Home in 1870: Rolla, Phelps, Missouri 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Post Office: Rolla 
Census Place: Rolla, Phelps, Missouri; 
Roll M593_797; Page: 693B; Image: 610; 
Family History Library Film: 552296.
living with parents

Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002 
Name: Nancy S Boatright 
Marriage Date: 17 Dec 1876 
Marriage County: Phelps 
Spouse Name: G B Newton 

1880 Census:
Name: Nancy Newton 
Date: June 5, 1880
Home in 1880: Dillon, Phelps, Missouri 
Age: 33 
Estimated birth year: abt 1847 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Relation to Head of Household: Self (Head) 
Father's birthplace: North Carolina 
Mother's birthplace: Tennessee 
Occupation: Keeping House 
Marital Status: Widowed 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Census Place: Dillon, Phelps, Missouri; 
Roll T9_709; Family History Film: 1254709; Page: 335.3000; 
Enumeration District: 124; Image: 0040.

1900 Census:
Name: Nancy S Boatwright
Date: June 2, 1900
Home in 1900: Rolla, Phelps, Missouri 
Age: 54 
Birth Date: Jul 1845 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Relationship to Head of House: Sister 
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina 
Mother's Birthplace: Tennessee 
Mother: number of living children: 1 
Mother: How many children: 1 
Marital Status: Widowed 
Residence : Rolla City, Phelps, Missouri 
Census Place: Rolla, Phelps, Missouri; 
Roll T623_881; Page: 3A; 
Enumeration District: 108.
Living with her sister Mary

Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002 
Name: Mrs. Nancy S Newton 
Age: 55 
Birth Date: abt 1847 
Marriage Date: 16 Aug 1902 
Marriage Location: Phelps, Missouri 
Marriage County: Phelps 
Spouse Name: Mr. Isael P Morse 
Spouse Age: 66 

1910 Census:
Name: Nancy S Morse 
Date: April 28, 1910
Age in 1910: 64 
Estimated birth year: abt 1846 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Relation to Head of House: Wife 
Father's Birth Place: North Carolina 
Mother's Birth Place: Tennessee 
Spouse's name: J P 
Home in 1910: Rolla Ward 2, Phelps, Missouri 
Marital Status: Married 
Race: White 
Gender: Female 
Census Place: Rolla Ward 2, Phelps, Missouri; 
Roll T624_797; Page: 21B; 
Enumeration District: 69; Image: 1061.

1920 Census:
Name: Nancy S Morse 
Date: January 3, 1920
Home in 1920: Maryland Heights, St Louis, Missouri 
Age: 73 years  
Estimated birth year: abt 1847 
Birthplace: Tennessee 
Relation to Head of House: Mother 
Father's Birth Place: North Carolina 
Mother's Birth Place: North Carolina 
Marital Status: Widow 
Race: White 
Sex: Female 
Able to read: Yes 
Able to Write: Yes 
Census Place: Maryland Heights, St Louis, Missouri; 
Roll T625_946; Page: 1B; 
Enumeration District: 132; Image: 776.
Burial: Rolla Cemetery, Rolla, Phelps County, Missouri


Child of RICHARD BOATWRIGHT and NANCY OWEN is:

9-304C.   i. JOHN P. BOATWRIGHT, b. 24 April 1866, Missouri; d. 16 Feb 1954, 
                                  St. Louis County, Missouri.

8-147. MARTHA ADELINE BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1842 in Henderson County, Tennessee.


Notes for MARTHA ADELINE BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Adeline Boatwright
Date: August 18, 1850
Age: 14
Estimated birth year: abt 1836
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Kaw, Jackson County, Missouri
Page: 249
Roll: M432_402

1860 Census:
Name: Matha A Boatright
Date: September 24, 1860
Age in 1860: 18
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: Sugar Loaf, Carroll County, Arkansas
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_38
Page: 914
Year: 1860
Head of Household: William Boatright

8-148. JOHN LEWIS BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1844 in Henderson County, Tennessee, and died 15 May 1888 in Mansfield, Wright County, Missouri.


Notes for JOHN LEWIS BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Louis Boatwright
Date: August 18, 1850
Age: 6
Estimated birth year: abt 1844
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Kaw, Jackson County, Missouri
Page: 249
Roll: M432_402

1860 Census:
Name: John L Boatright
Date: September 24, 1860
Age in 1860: 16
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: Sugar Loaf, Carroll County, Arkansas
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_38
Page: 914
Year: 1860
Head of Household: William Boatright

8-149. JULIANN BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1846 in Arkansas.


Notes for JULIANN BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Julia Boatwright
Date: August 18, 1850
Age: 4
Estimated birth year: abt 1846
Birth place: Arkansas
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Kaw, Jackson County, Missouri
Page: 249
Roll: M432_402

1860 Census:
Name: Juliann Boatright
Date: September 24, 1860
Age in 1860: 15
Birthplace: Arkansas
Home in 1860: Sugar Loaf, Carroll County, Arkansas
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_38
Page: 914
Year: 1860
Head of Household: William Boatright

8-150. PRUDENCE CATHERINE BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1848 in Arkansas.


Notes for PRUDENCE CATHERINE BOATWRIGHT:

1850 Census:
Name: Catherine Boatwright
Date: August 18, 1850
Age: 3
Estimated birth year: abt 1847
Birth place: Arkansas
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Kaw, Jackson County, Missouri
Page: 249
Roll: M432_402

1860 Census:
Name: Prudence C Boatright
Date: September 24, 1860
Age in 1860: 12
Birthplace: Arkansas
Home in 1860: Sugar Loaf, Carroll County, Arkansas
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_38
Page: 914
Year: 1860
Head of Household: William Boatright

8-151. PETER B. BOATRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 02 Sep 1851 in Arkansas, and died 06 Apr 1917 in Ozark County, Missouri. He married FRANCES LEVINA MIDGETT 23 Mar 1873 in Ozark County, Missouri, daughter of MICAJAH MIDGETT and SUSAN MILLER. She was born 23 May 1852 in Calloway County, Kentucky, and died 25 Sep 1935 in Bridges, Ozark County, Missouri.


Notes for PETER B. BOATRIGHT:

Peter B. Boatright Gravestone

1860 Census:
Name: Peter Boatright
Date: September 24, 1860
Age in 1860: 9
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1860: Sugar Loaf, Carroll County, AR
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_38
Page: 914
Year: 1860
Head of Household: William Boatright

1880 Census:
Name: Peter BOATWRIGHT
Date: June 10, 1880
Age: 28
Estimated birth year: <1852>
Birthplace: Arkansas
Occupation: Farmer
Relationship to head-of-household: Self
Home in 1880: Bayou, Ozark, Missouri
Marital status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Male
Spouse's name: Francis BOATWRIGHT
Father's birthplace: ---
Mother's birthplace: TN
Census Place: Bayou, Ozark, Missouri; 
Roll: T9_707; Family History Film: 1254707; Page: 554D; 
Enumeration District: 110; Image: 0695.

1900 Census:
Name: Peter B Boatwright
Date: June 16, 1900
Home in 1900: Bayou, Ozark, Missouri
Age: 48
Estimated birth year: 1852
Birthplace: Missouri
Race: White
Relationship to head-of-house: Head
Occupation: Farmer
Census Place: Bayou, Ozark, Missouri; 
Roll: T623 880; Page: 6A; 
Enumeration District: 91.

1910 Census:
Name: Peter B Boatright
Date: April 18, 1910
Age in 1910: 58
Estimated birth year: abt 1852
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1910: Bridges, Ozark, Missouri
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Mother's Birth Place: Tennessee
Father's Birth Place: Tennessee
Census Place: Bridges, Ozark, Missouri;
Roll: T624_804; Page: 4A; 
Enumeration District: 134; Image: 437.
Burial: Sallee Cemetery, Ozark County, Missouri


Notes for FRANCES LEVINA MIDGETT:

Frances Levina Midgett Boatright Gravestone

Kentucky Birth Records, 1852-1910 
Name: Frances L Midgett 
Birth Date: 23 May 1852 
Birth County: Calloway  
Ethnicity: White  
Gender: Female  
Father's Name: M Midgett 
Mother's Name: Susan Miller 
County of Residence: Calloway  

1880 Census:
Name: Francis BOATWRIGHT
Date: June 10, 1880
Age: 28
Estimated birth year: <1852>
Birthplace: Kentucky
Occupation: Keeping House
Relationship to head-of-household: Wife
Home in 1880: Bayou, Ozark, Missouri
Marital status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Female
Spouse's name: Peter BOATWRIGHT
Father's birthplace: KY
Mother's birthplace: IN
Census Place: Bayou, Ozark, Missouri; 
Roll: T9_707; Family History Film: 1254707; Page: 554D; 
Enumeration District: 110; Image: 0695.

1900 Census:
Name: Frances Boatwright
Date: June 16, 1900
Home in 1900: Bayou, Ozark, Missouri
Age: 48
Estimated birth year: 1852
Birthplace: Kentucky
Race: White
Relationship to head-of-house: Wife
Census Place: Bayou, Ozark, Missouri; 
Roll: T623 880; Page: 6A; 
Enumeration District: 91.

1910 Census:
Name: Frances L Boatright
Date: April 18, 1910
Age in 1910: 58
Estimated birth year: abt 1852
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1910: Bridges, Ozark, Missouri
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Mother's Birth Place: Tennessee
Father's Birth Place: Tennessee
Census Place: Bridges, Ozark, Missouri;
Roll: T624_804; Page: 4A; 
Enumeration District: 134; Image: 437.

1920 Census:
Name: Vina Boatright
Date: January 21, 1920
Age: 67 years
Estimated birth year: abt 1853
Birthplace: Kentucky
Race: White
Home in 1920: Bridges, Ozark, Missouri
Sex: Female
Marital status: Widow
Relation to Head of House: Mother
Mother's Birth Place: South Carolina
Father's Birth Place: South Carolina
Census Place: Bridges, Ozark, Missouri;
Roll: T625_936; Page: 10A; 
Enumeration District: 148; Image: 1003.
Burial: Sallee Cemetery, Ozark County, Missouri


Children of PETER BOATRIGHT and FRANCES MIDGETT are:

9-305.    i. WILLIAM D. BOATRIGHT, b. 22 Nov 1874, Ozark County, Missouri.

9-306.   ii. MICAJAH RICHARD BOATRIGHT, b. 11 Mar 1876, Ozark County, Missouri; 
                                         d. 07 Oct 1941, Ozark County, 
                                         Missouri.
9-307.  iii. JOHN LEONARD BOATRIGHT, b. 01 May 1877, Ozark County, Missouri; 
                                      d. 28 Dec 1967, Republic, Greene County, 
                                      Missouri.
9-308.   iv. LUCY BELL BOATRIGHT, b. 24 Feb 1881, Ozark County, Missouri; 
                                   d. 07 Jun 1953, West Plains, Howell County, 
                                   Missouri.
9-309.    v. OSCAR OLIVER BOATRIGHT, b. 15 Aug 1883, Ozark County, Missouri; 
                                      d. 12 Aug 1958, Springfield, Greene 
                                      County, Missouri.
9-310.   vi. JAMES AUSTIN BOATRIGHT, b. 22 Jul 1886, Ozark County, Missouri; 
                                      d. 25 Jan 1938, Greene County, Missouri.
9-311.  vii. ROSCOE COCKLIN "BOSS" BOATRIGHT, b. 22 Jul 1889, Ozark County, Missouri; 
                                               d. 17 Apr 1986, Springfield, 
                                               Greene County, Missouri.

8-152. WILLIAM M. BOATWRIGHT (WILLIAM8, JACOB7, WILLIAM6, THOMAS5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1856 in Arkansas.


Notes for WILLIAM M. BOATWRIGHT:

1860 Census:
Name: William M Boatright
Date: September 24, 1860
Age in 1860: 3
Birthplace: Arkansas
Home in 1860: Sugar Loaf, Carroll County, Arkansas
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Dubuque
Roll: M653_38
Page: 914
Year: 1860
Head of Household: William Boatright

Boatwright/Boatright Family Genealogy Website
created by George Boatright, boatgenealogy@yahoo.com
Please e-mail any additions / corrections / comments.

last modified: May 21, 2013

URL: http://www.boatwrightgenealogy.com


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