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Boat(w)right Family Genealogy in America

Generation 7


7-237. WILLIAM BOATRIGHT (JOHN SAMUEL7, DANIEL6, WILLIAM5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1812 in Tennessee, and died in Alabama. He married NANCY MORGAN, 28 Apr 1851.


Notes for WILLIAM BOATRIGHT:

1840 Census:
Name: Wm Boatwright
Township: Not Stated
County: Wilcox
State: Alabama
Roll: 16
Page: 337
2 males: 0 - 5, 1 male: 30 - 40,
1 female: 20 - 30,
4 total

7-238. EDMOND BOATRIGHT (JOHN SAMUEL7, DANIEL6, WILLIAM5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born Abt. 1815 in Tennessee, and died Bef. 1900 in Chickasaw, Colbert County, Alabama. He married NANCY M.. She was born 1823 in Alabama, and died Bef. 1880 in Chickasaw, Colbert County, Alabama.


Notes for EDMOND BOATRIGHT:

1860 Census:
Name: Edmond Boatright
Date: September 7, 1860
Age in 1860: 45
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: Eastern Subdivision, Franklin County, Alabama
Occupation: Tanner
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Lagrange
Roll: M653_10
Page: 612
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Edmond Boatright

1870 Census:
Name: Edmon Boatrite
Date: July 11, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1813
Age in 1870: 57
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1870: Township 2 Range 15, Colbert, Alabama
Occupation: Farmer
Race: White
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Chickasaw
Roll: M593_10
Page: 128
Image: 252
Year: 1870

1880 Census:
Name: Edmond BOATRIGHT
Date: June 10, 1880
Age: 66
Estimated birth year: <1814>
Birthplace: Alabama
Occupation: Farmer
Relationship to head-of-household: Self
Home in 1880: Chickasaw, Colbert, Alabama
Marital status: Widower
Race: White
Gender: Male
Father's birthplace: MS
Mother's birthplace: MS
Census Place: Chickasaw, Colbert, Alabama; 
Roll: T9_8; Family History Film: 1254008; Page: 378D; 
Enumeration District: 33; Image: 0527.

Notes for NANCY M.:
1860 Census:
Name: Nancy M Boatright
Date: September 7, 1860
Age in 1860: 36
Birthplace: Alabama
Home in 1860: Eastern Subdivision, Franklin County, Alabama
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Lagrange
Roll: M653_10
Page: 612
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Edmond Boatright

1870 Census:
Name: Nancy Boatrite
Date: July 11, 1870
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1823
Age in 1870: 47
Birthplace: Alabama
Home in 1870: Township 2 Range 15, Colbert, Alabama
Race: White
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Chickasaw
Roll: M593_10
Page: 128
Image: 252
Year: 1870


Children of EDMOND BOATRIGHT and NANCY M. are:

8-667.    i. WILLIAM S. BOATRIGHT, b. 1843, Alabama.

8-668.   ii. E. UZEDA BOATRIGHT, b. 1846, Alabama.

8-669.  iii. JANE S. BOATRIGHT, b. 1848, Alabama.

8-670.   iv. FRANCES A. L. BOATRIGHT, b. 1851, Alabama.

8-671.    v. JAMES MATTHEW BOATRIGHT, b. 1857, Alabama; 
                                       d. 1911.
8-672.   vi. JOHN CLARK BOATRIGHT, b. 1859, Alabama; 
                                    d. 10 Jun 1932, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.
8-673.  vii. DANIEL THOMAS BOATRIGHT, b. 1862, Alabama; 
                                       d. 13 Nov 1951, Sheffield, Colbert County, 
                                       Alabama.

7-239. MIRA BOATRIGHT (JOHN SAMUEL7, DANIEL6, WILLIAM5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 1818 in Tennessee. She married ALPHA WALKER. He was born Abt. 1822 in North Carolina.


Notes for MIRA BOATRIGHT:

1860 Census:
Name: Myra Walker
Date: July 2, 1860
Age in 1860: 41
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: Eastern Subdivision, Franklin County, Alabama
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Russellville
Roll: M653_10
Page: 562
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Alfha Walker

Notes for ALPHA WALKER:
1860 Census:
Name: Alfha Walker
Date: July 2, 1860
Age in 1860: 38
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1860: Eastern Subdivision, Franklin County, Alabama
Occupation: Grocer
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $300
Post Office: Russellville
Roll: M653_10
Page: 562
Year: 1860
Head of Household: Alfha Walker


Children of MIRA BOATRIGHT and ALPHA WALKER are:

        i. SAMUEL J. WALKER, b. 1846, Alabama.

       ii. WILLIAM J. WALKER, b. 1849, Alabama.

      iii. SUSAN C. WALKER, b. 1856, Alabama.

7-240. DANIEL THOMAS BOATRIGHT (JOHN SAMUEL7, DANIEL6, WILLIAM5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, Not Yet Determined1) was born 20 Aug 1819 in Tennessee, and died 20 Jun 1863 in Catoosa Springs Hospital, Georgia. He married RACHEL LAWLER 12 Mar 1846. She was born 01 Jan 1828 near Russellville, Franklin County, Alabama, and died 25 Jan 1897 in Texas.


Notes for DANIEL THOMAS BOATRIGHT:

Daniel Thomas Boatright - 1861

Daniel Thomas Boatright is found in the 1850 census of Franklin Co., Ala and listed his occupation as deputy sheriff. He served as deputy sheriff and jailer of Russellville. He moved to Bell Co. Tex. in 1852, and settled near Eakin. He traveled by way of Tenn. to cross the Mississippi River, stopping in Ark. to raise a crop before coming on to Tex. In Texas he bought a farm and operated a furniture shop. He had studied medicine but did not practice. When he went to war, he sold the furniture factory to Lyman (Ike) Beeman, who's dau., Alice married L.B. Russell She was the granddaughter of Dorothy Long.

Another source said he was engaged in the cabinet business. Sold to Alonza Bee to open a mercantile business at which he was engaged until his entrance in the war in 1861. Moffett had a felt hat factory, and the Franklin bros. Gunsmith shop. The McAulay's had a tanning yard and a wagon shop. Moffett was a busy community. It is not known why Boatright chose Moffett.

D.T. Boatright enlisted 28 Jan 1862 at Ft. Hebert, Tx. A Lt. Barton signed him into Co. K, 10th Regiment, also called Nelson's Reg. The Reg. was organized in Oct 1861 with eight companies, A to H. which were mustered into service on various dates from Oct. 13 to 319 1861. Co. I & K were mustered into service on 16 & 28 Jan 1862, respectfully. Most of the Reg. was captured at Ark. Post, Ark. on 11 Jan 1863.

Daniel Thomas was absent from the Reg. role, being an recruiting service from 30 Jan 1862 Camp Arkansas Post, Ark, December 9th 1862.

Daniel Thomas Boatright Marker - he is not buried here

Daniel was captured and in a Prisoner of War camp on Lake Erie. One account says he died at Catoosa Springs Hospital in Georgia, and another says he died on the train as he was being sent back to Texas, and his burial is unknown. He was married to Rachel Lawler, and was the father of Eldon, Daniel Thomas, Jr., John Samuel and Irene.

There is a marker at Elmwood Cemetery, Hartshorne, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma. The actual burial location is unknown.

Sir
I hereby respectfully tender my resignation of the office of Second Lieutenant of Company (K) Tenth Texas Regt. volunteer infantry on account of disability caused by having had fever about the Ist of August and since that time a severe pain in my left side with an enlargement of the glands at the throat. I have not been able to do but little duty since and have but little hope of recovering if I remain in camp through the winter.

With great respect from your obt. servant
D.T.Boatright, 2nd Lt.
Co. (K) 10th Texas Regt. V.T.

D.T.Boatright, 2 Lt. 10 Reg't Tex Cav, appears on a descriptive roll of Prisoners of War at Camp Chase, Ohio.

Camp Chase Camp Chase was officially dedicated June 20, 1861. It is named in honor of Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873), former governor of Ohio, the Secretary of the Treasury under President Abraham Lincoln, and later Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Initially designated as a training camp for new recruits in the Union Army, Camp Chase was converted to a military prison as the first prisoners of war arrived from western Virginia. In the early months of the Civil War, Camp Chase primarily held political prisoners--judges, legislators and mayors from Kentucky and Virginia accused of loyalty to the Confederacy. In early 1862, Camp Chase served briefly as a prison for Confederate officers. But after a military prison for Confederate officers opened at Johnson's Island, Ohio, Camp Chase housed only non-commissioned officers, enlisted men, and political prisoners.

In February 1862, 800 prisoners of war (officers and enlisted men) arrived at Camp Chase. Included among the 800 Confederate soldiers were approximately 75 African Americans; about half of whom were slaves, the other half being servants to the confederate officers. Much to the horror and dismay of the citizens of Columbus, these men continued to serve their master's in the prison camp. An Ohio Legislative committee was formed and protests over the continued enslavement of these men were sent to Washington D.C. The African Americans were finally released in April and May of 1862; some then enlisted in the Union army.

According to an exchange agreement reached between North and South on July 22, 1862, Camp Chase was to operate as a way station for the immediate repatriation (return to country of birth or citizenship) of Confederate soldiers. After this agreement was mutually abandoned July 13, 1863, the facility swelled with new prisoners, and military inmates quickly outnumbered political prisoners. By the end of the war, Camp Chase held 26,000 of all 36,000 Confederate POWs retained in Ohio military prisons. Crowded and unhealthy living conditions at Camp Chase took a heavy toll among prisoners. Despite newly constructed barracks in 1864, which raised the prison capacity to 8,000 men, the facility was soon operating well over capacity. Rations for prisoners were reduced in retaliation against alleged mistreatment at Southern POW camps. Many prisoners suffered from malnutrition and died from smallpox, typhoid fever or pneumonia. Others, even those who received meager clothing provisions, suffered from severe exposure during the especially cold winter of 1865. In all, 2,229 soldiers died at Camp Chase by July 5, 1865, when it officially closed.

Living conditions at Camp Chase were harsh for the Southern prisoners. While Union authorities never intentionally starved the prisoners, the Northern officials' primary goal was to feed and equip the men serving in their own army, commonly resulting in shortages for the prisoners. The large number of men in such close quarters also caused diseases to thrive in the prison. During the winter of 1863-1864, hundreds of prisoners died from a smallpox epidemic. In November 1864, Union and Confederate authorities agreed upon a prisoner exchange hoping to alleviate the suffering of sick prisoners held by both sides. A total of ten thousand prisoners were exchanged, illustrating the harsh conditions in military prison camps.

During the course of the Civil War, over two thousand Confederate prisoners died at Camp Chase. Originally, prison officials had the deceased interred in the Columbus city cemetery. In 1863, the prison established its own cemetery, and the bodies already buried in the Columbus cemetery were re-interred in the prison cemetery. Following the war, thirty-one Confederate bodies buried at Camp Dennison near Cincinnati were re-interred at the Camp Chase cemetery, bringing the total number of Confederate burials to approximately 2,260.

Camp Chase The Union military abandoned Camp Chase at the end of the Civil War. All that remains of the site today is two acres of land, consisting primarily of the cemetery. In 1896, William Knauss, a former officer in the Northern army, organized a memorial service for the dead Confederates. On June 7, 1902, a monument to the Confederate dead was erected at the cemetery. Memorial services have continued at the cemetery every year since 1896.

Arrested Arkans, Post, Mo. Jan 11, 1863
Received at Camp Chase, Ohio Jan 30, 1863
Whence - S. Louis, Mo, By order of Maj. Gen. Curtis
Description: Height 5 ft. 4 in.; age 43, Eyes grey, hair dk, complexion dk, date of departure, Apr 10, 1863; Remarks; transferred to Ft. Delaware

In Prisoner of war camp on Lake Erie - per Francis Speck.

Catoosa Springs Hospital, Ga.
20 June, 1863

Daniel T. Boatright 2 Lieutenant of Company K 10th Texas Regiment died at this hospital today. Disease Scarfula with intercurrent Diarrhea. His effects were transferred by himself on the day previous to his death to Capt. S. Hartgrave of Company H of the same Regiment.

Robt. C. Foster
Surg. P.A. S in Chg


Catoosa Springs Confederate Hospital State Historical Marker Catoosa Springs Confederate Hospital State Historical Marker
Located at Keith Rd. about .7 mile of Ga. 2, east of U.S. 41

(Text)

CATOOSA SPRINGS CONFEDERATE HOSPITALS

In 1862-1863 several Confederate hospitals were located here. The sick and wounded Confederate soldiers drank of the health-giving waters of the several mineral springs in this area. Drinking this mineral water and bathing in it enable many sick soldiers to return to duty. Early in October 1863 these hospitals were abandoned to prevent capture by Federal forces. A skirmish took place here May 3, 1864. Part of the 4th Army Corps [USA], under General Howard camped here May 4th, 5th, and 6th, 1864.

023-13 GEORGIA HISTORIC MARKER 1987

The following is from a letter from Mody C. Boatright to Mrs. Thomas T. Morris, dated April 15, 1970. The complete letter can be found on page 340 in Buttonhole Kinfolks.

Dear Cousin Jessie:
I was in Abilene last week and while I was there Myrtle and I looked through some old pictures and family documents. We found in a note book that Frank had kept the entry below: Captured at Ark Port 11 Jan. after days of fight with a loss of 131 killed and wounded. Put aboard transport __________. Then off to Memphis, there spent one day and night. The to Caso. Then to St. Lois. Then by railroad to Columbus, went by way of Cincinnatti. At St. Louis officers and privates were seperated.

We got to Camp Chase on the night of 28 January. I was suffering from Cold, went to the hospital same night. Sergeon is charge was Dr. Wall of Virginia assisted by _________ of Kentucky, both good and true southern men.

Copied from Grandpa Boatright's Diary, by Frankie Boatright, June 20, 1904

And below the letter a memo from John S. Woodward: from Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Fort Hindman, better known as Post of the Ark, or Ark. Post, was located on the North bank of Arkansas River, 50 miles above the mouth of the river, and 117 miles below Little Rock. Confederate loss, 60 killed and 75-80 wounded. 4791 prisoners. Union loss 1061 killed and wounded.

Masonic Records of D. T. Boatright.

He received his degrees in 1846, on Jul 13, Aug 25, and Sep 12. from Franklin Lodge No. 60 at Russellville, Ala. and affiliated with Leon Lodge No. 193, A.F. &A.M. On 25 Nov 1936 Leon Lodge No 193 merged with Knob Creek Lodge No. 401,Temple, Texas.

NOTE; per Mrs. T.T. Norris, The Masonic Lodge assumed the support of Rachel Lawler Baatright, the widow, and her children.

Source, D.T. Boatright, 3907 Durango Dr., Norman, Ok. 73069

1850 Census:
Name: D T Boatright
Age: 31
Estimated birth year: abt 1819
Birth place: Tennessee
Gender: Male
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 6, Franklin, Alabama
Page: 217
Roll: M432_5

1860 Census:
Name: D T Boatright
Date: June 22, 1860
Age in 1860: 41
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: Not Stated, Bell County, Texas
Occupation: Merchant
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: $850
Post Office: Belton
Roll: M653_1288
Page: 311
Year: 1860
Head of Household: D T Boatright

Notes for RACHEL LAWLER:

Rachel Lawler Boatright - 1861

1850 Census:
Name: Rachel Boatright
Age: 23
Estimated birth year: abt 1827
Birth place: Alabama
Gender: Female
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): District 6, Franklin, AL
Page: 217
Roll: M432_5

1860 Census:
Name: Rachael Boatright
Date: June 22, 1860
Age in 1860: 31
Birthplace: Alabama
Home in 1860: Not Stated, Bell County, Texas
Gender: Female
Value of real estate: $0
Post Office: Belton
Roll: M653_1288
Page: 311
Year: 1860
Head of Household: D T Boatright



Rachel Lawler Boatright Gravestone 1870 Census: Name: R Boatright Date: June 28, 1870 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1829 Age in 1870: 41 Birthplace: Ala Home in 1870: Beat 2, Bell, Texas Occupation: Keeping House Race: White Gender: Female Value of real estate: $500 Post Office: Aiken Roll: M593_1575 Page: 28 Image: 56 Year: 1870 1880 Census: Name: Rachael BOATRIGHT Date: June 19, 1880 Age: 53 Estimated birth year: <1827> Birthplace: Alabama Occupation: Keeping House Relationship to head-of-household: Mother Home in 1880: Precinct 4, Coleman, Texas Marital status: Widowed Race: White Gender: Female Father's birthplace: AL Mother's birthplace: AL Census Place: Precinct 4, Coleman, Texas; Roll: T9_1296; Family History Film: 1255296; Page: 530B; Enumeration District: 42; Image: . living with son John














Burial: Elmwood Cemetery, Hartshorne, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma



Children of DANIEL BOATRIGHT and RACHEL LAWLER are:

8-674.    i. WILLIAM KEATH BOATRIGHT, b. 20 Aug 1847, Alabama; d. 15 Oct 1847,
                                       Alabama.
8-675.   ii. ELDON BOATRIGHT, b. 15 Dec 1848, Russellville, Franklin County,
                               Alabama; d. 19 Jun 1934, Abilene, Taylor County,
                               Texas.
8-676.  iii. LOUISA ELIZABETH BOATRIGHT, b. 19 Apr 1851, Alabama; d. 01 Jun 
                                        1921.
8-677.   iv. JOHN SAMUEL BOATRIGHT, b. 16 Jun 1854, Texas; d. 31 Dec 1894, 
                                     Pittsburg County, Oklahoma.
8-678.    v. JANTHA BOATRIGHT, b. 11 Jun 1856, Texas; d. 17 Apr 1864, Bell
                                County, Texas.
8-679.   vi. DANIEL THOMAS BOATRIGHT, b. 15 Apr 1858, Bell County, Texas; 
                                       d. 21 Jul 1951, Hartshorne, Pittsburg 
                                       County, Oklahoma.
8-680.  vii. IRENE UZEDA BOATRIGHT, b. 08 Jun 1861, Bell County, Texas;
                                     d. 07 Oct 1951.

Boatwright/Boatright Family Genealogy Website
created by George Boatright, boatgenealogy@yahoo.com
Please e-mail any additions / corrections / comments.

last modified: July 19, 2011

URL: http://www.boatwrightgenealogy.com


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